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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC040203 RR
Question Submitted
April 4, 2020
Date Completed
April 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC040203 RR
Question Submitted
April 4, 2020
Date Completed
April 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
One study indicated a significant reduction in mortality in regions with field hospitals
Cited as an important management tool of mild to moderate cases to prevent further transmission and allow rapid referral to higher level hospitals in the case of deterioration
Ability to significantly free up scarce resources for severe to critical cases
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M. What is the evidence for early implementation of field hospitals for COVID-19? 2020 Apr 4; Document no.: EOC040203 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 7 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC040203-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 4, 2020
Date Completed
April 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC040203-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 4, 2020
Date Completed
April 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Mueller, M. What is the evidence for early implementation of field hospitals for COVID-19? 2020 Apr 4; Document no.: EOC040203-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 7 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC042202 RR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
April 27, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC042202 RR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
April 27, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
There are no published or grey literature that directly address the review questions · A number of principle based guidelines/recommendations/criteria are available and reviewed. It appears that the WHO interim guidance "Considerations in adjusting public health and social measures in the context of COVID-19" is the best piece of evidence available right now. It is included in the reference list below.
Notes
INTERIM Rapid Review
Category
Administration
Subject
Closures
Reopening
Health Planning
Outcome Assessment
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Miller, L; Young, C. What is the best evidence to guide the sequence or priority of re-opening each type of healthcare service and how have the closures impacted patients? 2020 Apr 24; Document no.: EOC042202 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC042202-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
April 23, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC042202-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
April 23, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Closures
Reopening
Health Planning
Outcome Assessment
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Miller, L; Young, C. What is the best evidence to guide the sequence or priority of re-opening each type of healthcare service and how have the closures impacted patients? 2020 Apr 23; Document no.: EOC042202-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC042401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
April 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC042401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
April 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Family
Long Term Care
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
NICU
Oncology
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Boden, C; Ellsworth, C. What are best practices for engaging family care providers during a pandemic? 2020 Apr 30; Document no.: LTC042401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 32 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC042401 RR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
May 7, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC042401 RR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
May 7, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Key Findings
Core concepts of family engagement include dignity and respect, information sharing, participation in care and decision making, and collaboration (Hart 2020).
A careful balance needs to be maintained between attending to patients’ physical and psychological needs and adhering to infection control guidelines, while offering psychological support to family members (Chan 2006).
The word ‘visitation’ does not adequately describe family members’ involvement. Family presence is a more suitable term as it redefines families as partners in care (Hart 2020). However, it is important to recognize that family presence is not a substitute for adequate staffing levels.
Very little guidance is provided in the literature on innovative or specific approaches engage family care providers during a pandemic. The literature mainly focuses on supporting alternate forms of communication such as telephone calls, or technology assisted communication through social media or video/voice calls.
Enhanced communication strategies that provide regular information to a primary family contact on the patient/resident condition and allow chosen care partners to contribute to decision making as much as possible are recommended (Koller 2006).
The negative impact of visitation restrictions places increased stress on patients/residents and families who are unable to provide or receive non-healthcare specific supportive care. Those with neurocognitive disorders or communication barriers are more significantly impacted.
Staff also report increased stress during family visitation restrictions due to the additional time required to take on a “familial role” for the patient/resident. These roles may include providing a supportive environment, social interaction, information sharing, and opportunities for play (Koller 2006a – pediatric hospital setting).
The search question did not specifically look at impact of visitation on infection rates; therefore, there is insufficient information to determine if visitation policies affect infection rates. However, a systematic review in pediatric hospital setting in Ontario found no connection between liberal visiting hours and increased SARS infection rates (Smith 2009).
When facilitating sibling visitation in the NICU, a pre-visit education process is recommended. Maternity settings may wish to consider a 'combination' policy, where the women's partners and/or significant other would have open visiting (all day), with restricted visiting for others. In other general hospital ward settings, open visiting with a 'quiet hour' is suggested (Smith 2009).
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Family
Long Term Care
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
NICU
Oncology
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Tupper, S; Ward, H; Dalidowicz, M; Boden, C; Ellsworth, C; What are best practices for engaging family care providers during a pandemic? 2020 Apr 16; Document no.: LTC042401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 22 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC042202-02 ESR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
May 6, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC042202-02 ESR
Question Submitted
April 22, 2020
Date Completed
May 6, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Closures
Reopening
Health Planning
Outcome Assessment
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Miller, L; Young, C. What is the best evidence to guide the sequence or priority of re-opening each type of healthcare service and how have the closures impacted patients? 2020 May 6; Document no.: EOC042202-02 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 31 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH092301-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 23, 2020
Date Completed
September 25, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH092301-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 23, 2020
Date Completed
September 25, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Administration
Subject
Screening
Contact Tracing
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. Are less frequent (than daily) follow-up/monitoring used for close contacts in COVID or other communicable diseases? 2020 Sep 25; Document no.: PH092301-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 27 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC100801-01 ESR
Question Submitted
October 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC100801-01 ESR
Question Submitted
October 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Risk
Elderly
Facilities
Health Personnel
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the age restrictions for healthcare workers/volunteers? 2020 Oct 13; Document no.: EOC100801-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC100801 RR
Question Submitted
October 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC100801 RR
Question Submitted
October 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Well established that older individuals, particularly those with pre-existing conditions are at increased risk of severe disease and/or complications with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and volunteers should take this into consideration · No other evidence specific to healthcare workers or volunteers to guide age restriction policies
Category
Administration
Subject
Risk
Elderly
Facilities
Health Personnel
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the age restrictions for healthcare workers/volunteer? 2020 Oct 19; Document no.: EOC100801 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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89 records – page 1 of 9.