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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041402 RR
Question Submitted
April 14, 2020
Date Completed
April 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041402 RR
Question Submitted
April 14, 2020
Date Completed
April 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
The majority of patients (>50%) appear to seroconvert between 8-14 days following the onset of symptoms.
Nearly all patients (>80%) seroconvert >15 days following the onset of symptoms.
The IgM response is detected earlier (median 12 days) than the IgG response (median 14 days).
Seroconversion appears to follow clinical recovery in most cases.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Antibodies
Natural History
Serology
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Reeder, B; Duncan, V. At what time in the disease timeline of COVID-19 do antibodies develop? 2020 Apr 15; Document no.: LAB041402 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 4 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041501 RR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041501 RR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
Seroconversion occurs in majority of COVID-19 patients from the second week following symptomonseton.
Between 7.8 -43.6% of suspect cases and 4.7% of asymptomatic individuals with negative nucleic acid test (rt-PCR) test positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
An increase in antibody titrescorrelates with a neutralizing antibody response and positive recovery of COVID-19 patients with mild to moderate symptoms.
Although higher antibody titreand more robust antibody response are observed in severe and critically ill patients, those antibodies may not effectively clear virus and higher antibody levels may be associated with a worse clinical progress.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Antibodies
Natural History
Serology
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Wang, H; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B. How well does the presence and level of antibodies predict the clinical course of disease? 2020 Apr 17; Document no.: LAB041501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040803 RR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
April 11, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040803 RR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
April 11, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
Low grade evidence shows IgG and IgM antibody response correlates with neutralizingantibody titerand viral clearance, which is suggestive of protective humoral immunity inCOVID-19 patients with mild to moderate symptoms.
There is no available evidence with which to estimate the durability of this protective response. However, if the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 resembles that toward SARS-CoV, this protective humoral immunity may persist for several years.
Higher IgG antibody titersand a robustresponse were noted in severe to criticallyill patients and were associated with lower viral clearance and a worse clinical prognosis.
Low grade evidence suggests that convalescent plasma treatment may improve the clinical status of critically ill COVID-19 patients(one case series with only five patients enrolled).
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Testing
Serology
Immunity
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Wang, H; Reeder, B; Duncan, V; Is the IgM or IgG immune response protective? 2020 Apr 11; Document no.: LAB040803 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 6 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer. However, more data are beginning to elucidate the nuances of these risks depending on patient specific factors.
Limited data indicate that pediatric cancer patients are not at a high level of risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19.
Limited evidence indicates some differences in the course and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection depending on the type of immunosuppressive therapy a patient receives.
Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer.
Pediatric cancer populations may not be at the same level of risk as adult populations.
There is not enough evidence at this time to determine if there are differences in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients receiving chemotherapy vs. those who are not aside from outcomes and severity.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Chemotherapy
Cancer
Comorbidities
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the differences in the clinical course of COVID-19 between patients undergoing chemotherapy and otherwise healthy individuals? 2021 Jan 22; Document no.: EOC062201v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC062201 RR: June 29, 2020
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PPE041701 RR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PPE041701 RR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
Key Findings
The most commonly reported symptoms inCOVID-19patientswere: fever (79-89%); cough (58-69%); fatigue/muscle aches (29-36%); dyspnea (22-38%); chest distress (31%); and expectoration (12-29%).
Less common were various GI symptoms (9-18%) including diarrhea (5-7%) and nausea (4%),as well as sore throat (10-12%) and headache (6-12%).
Although the Government of Canada lists runny nose as a potential symptom for a suspect case, it was not reported as such in the meta-analyses examined.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Natural History
Symptoms
Screening
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
McCarron, M; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What distinguishes COVID-19 from influenza-like illnesses? 2020 Apr 17; Document no.: PPE041701 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC072102 RR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC072102 RR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Children and adolescents (0 to 18 years) contributed 1- 10% of laboratory confirmed cases of COVID-19 globally. · Children have been reported to have milder symptoms of COVID-19 and have shown better prognosis as compared to adults. · Severe cases presenting as a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) has been reported in some pediatric cases of COVID-19. Many of these children meet the criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease, but different clinical presentations of this inflammatory disorder are being reported. · Underlying medical conditions and comorbidities such as such as sickle cell disease, immunocompromised condition, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and asthma have been associated with severity and complications from COVID-19 infection in pediatric patients. · Although rare, death from COVID-19 in children have been reported, with a case fatality rate of less than 0.5%.
Category
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Natural History
Symptoms
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Asamoah, G; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Ellsworth, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the disease progression and epidemiology of COVID-19 in pediatric populations? 2020 Jul 27; Document no.: EOC072102 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 17 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF042401 RR
Question Submitted
24-Apr-2020
Date Completed
April 27, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF042401 RR
Question Submitted
24-Apr-2020
Date Completed
April 27, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
The period of communicability of symptomatic SARS CoV-2 infections remains unclear.
Viral RNA shedding measured from the onset of illness is a common proxy used to estimate the period of communicability; however, confirmation of the viability of viral remnants in secretions through culture or other methods seldom occurs in practice.
Several factors including age, male sex and clinical severity influence individual variation in viral shedding and suggest the need for tailored control efforts.
Temporal patterns in viral shedding across different types of bodily secretions has implications for transmissibility and criteria for discontinuation of control measures during convalescence.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Epidemiology
Subject
Transmission
Symptoms
Symptomatic
Natural History
Asymptomatic
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Lee, S; Young, C; Dalidowicz, M; Mueller, M. What is the period of communicability of symptomatic SARS CoV-2? 2020 Apr 27; Document no.: INF042401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 24 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC091601 RR
Question Submitted
September 16, 2020
Date Completed
October 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC091601 RR
Question Submitted
September 16, 2020
Date Completed
October 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· There is no consistent definition of the post-acute COVID syndrome. · There is a need to distinguish between the rehabilitation needs of severe COVID patients and the persistent collection of symptoms that occur for a variable period of time in some patients. · Individuals with severe initial infections are more likely to have ongoing symptoms · The duration of post-covid symptoms is unclear at this point in time · The common post-covid symptoms can be grouped as general, respiratory, cardiovascular, mental health, and neurologic sequelae. · A follow up review is probably warranted
Category
Healthcare Services
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Long Covid
Natural History
Treatment
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Fox, L. What is the post acute covid syndrome and its implications in terms of health services? 2020 Oct 13; Document no.: EOC091601 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 28 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041601v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041601v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
Patients with higher and prolonged IgM antibodies are associated with more severe illness, poor recovery, and prolonged viral shedding (some patients may shed virus for more than 30 days).
Patients who respond weakly to IgG have higher viral clearance rate than strong responders.
There were no reports with direct information regarding infectiousness of patients.
Category
Diagnostics
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Transmission
Antibodies
Natural History
Population
All
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Reeder, B; Duncan, V. What is the relationship between antibody development and viral shedding and infectiousness? 2020 May 19; Document no.: LAB041601v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
LAB041601 RR: April 16, 2020
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC070201v2 RR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC070201v2 RR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
AUGUST 7th UPDATE: No new studies examining secondary attack rates of pediatric index cases were found. Studies continue to suggest low transmission from pediatric cases, and high proportion of pediatric cases being asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic.
Key Findings
· Pediatric cases of COVID-19 constitute between 1% to 10% of all confirmed cases of COVID-19; variation exists by jurisdiction. · Few case reports exist of confirmed child-to-other transmission. Contact tracing studies suggest that children are unlikely to be transmitters of the disease. Households are the most likely environments for transmission. · A recent large South Korean contact tracing study however (in pre-print) found that household COVID-19 transmission rates for children age 10-19 were significantly higher than in adults; transmission rates for children age 0-9 were relatively low.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Transmission
Symptoms
Natural History
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What is the transmissibility and epidemiology of COVID-19 in children and adolescents? 2020 Aug 14; Document no.: EOC070201v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 12 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC070201 RR: July 22, 2020
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12 records – page 1 of 2.