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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM050901 RR
Question Submitted
May 9, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM050901 RR
Question Submitted
May 9, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Key Findings
There is a growing body of research related to clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with COVID-19-related outcomes.
The risk of severe COVID-19 infection and mortality increases with advancing age, male sex and presence of comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.
Information is limited about some risk factors such as smoking exposure, racial/ethnic identity that could contribute to better understanding of risk stratification and support early intervention.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Risk
Mortality
Comorbidities
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C; Mueller, M. What are the risk factors for severity and death associated with COVID-19? 2020 May 17; Document no.: EPM050901 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 14 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM050901 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 9, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM050901 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 9, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Comorbidities
Risk
Mortality
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C; Mueller, M. What are the risk factors for severity and death associated with COVID-19? 2020 May 17; Document no.: EPM050901 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. (CEST table)
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EPM050901 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC092401 RR
Question Submitted
September 24, 2020
Date Completed
September 29, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC092401 RR
Question Submitted
September 24, 2020
Date Completed
September 29, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· The significance of rhinorrhea as a presenting/predictive clinical feature of COVID-19 is unclear at this time with rates ranging from as low as 2% to as high as 60% in the published literature · Rhinorrhea generally associated with less severe disease · No reports of sneezing as a clinical symptom of COVID-19
Category
Clinical Presentation
Administration
Subject
Symptoms
Screening
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Howell-Spooner, B; Young, C. What is the evidence that runny nose or sneezing are symptoms of COVID-19? 2020 Sep 29; Document no.: EOC092401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer. However, more data are beginning to elucidate the nuances of these risks depending on patient specific factors.
Limited data indicate that pediatric cancer patients are not at a high level of risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19.
Limited evidence indicates some differences in the course and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection depending on the type of immunosuppressive therapy a patient receives.
Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer.
Pediatric cancer populations may not be at the same level of risk as adult populations.
There is not enough evidence at this time to determine if there are differences in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients receiving chemotherapy vs. those who are not aside from outcomes and severity.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Chemotherapy
Cancer
Comorbidities
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the differences in the clinical course of COVID-19 between patients undergoing chemotherapy and otherwise healthy individuals? 2021 Jan 22; Document no.: EOC062201v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC062201 RR: June 29, 2020
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Chemotherapy
Cancer
Comorbidities
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the differences in the clinical course of COVID-19 between patients undergoing chemotherapy and otherwise healthy individuals? 2021 Jan 22; Document no.: EOC062201v2 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST table)
Review History
EOC062201 RR: June 29, 2020
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC220103 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 20, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC220103 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 20, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Presentation
Healthcare Services
Subject
Infection Prevention and Control
Risk
Vaccines
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the harmful/adverse effects of multiple doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines? 2022 Feb 04, Document no.: EOC220103 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. (CEST table).
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EOC220103 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC220103 RR
Question Submitted
January 20, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC220103 RR
Question Submitted
January 20, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Evidence to date of adverse events associated with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are largely local reactions such as pain and swelling of the injection site, and systemic reactions of an allergic nature
Increased incidences of myocarditis and pericarditis have been observed, most often occurring in men under 30 years of age, and most often after the second dose of mRNA vaccine, with more occurrences following the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine versus Pfizer, however all cases appear to resolve
To date, there is no evidence indicating a negative effect on the immune system from the administration of multiple doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines
Category
Clinical Presentation
Healthcare Services
Subject
Infection Prevention and Control
Risk
Vaccines
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the harmful/adverse effects of multiple doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines? 2022 Feb 04, Document no.: EOC220103 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF220501 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 16, 2022
Date Completed
June 6, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF220501 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 16, 2022
Date Completed
June 6, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Clinical Presentation
Diagnostics
Subject
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 Three weeks (21 days)
Cite As
Groot, G; Reeder, B; Muhajarine, N; Lee, S; Badea, A; Fox, L; Miller, L. What is known about hybrid immunity to COVID-19? 2022 Jun 06, Document no.: INF220501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. (CEST table).
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INF220501 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF220501 RR
Question Submitted
May 16, 2022
Date Completed
June 6, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF220501 RR
Question Submitted
May 16, 2022
Date Completed
June 6, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
There is substantial immunologic and increasing epidemiologic evidence that vaccination following infection further increases protection against subsequent illness among those who have been previously infected.
Laboratory studies indicate that hybrid immunity (i.e., immunity conferred by the combination of previous infection and vaccination) offers greater protection against COVID-19 infection.
A single dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine following SARS-CoV-2 infection induced a 2 to 3-fold increase in anti-Spike and -RBD IgG levels 30 days post-vaccination.
A study in Brazil found that hybrid immunity showed a modest increase in protection against symptomatic infection and waning over time.
Neutralising antibody titres against SARS-CoV-2 variants over 7 months following Pfizer vaccination in SARS-CoV-2-recovered and naïve healthcare workers resulted in substantially enhanced T-cell responses, anti-spike IgG responses and neutralising antibodies effective against SARS-CoV-2 variants in recovered participants.
Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were associated with greater IgG responses compared to Johnson & Johnson regardless of administration following infection.
Those with vaccine-after-infection or vaccine-breakthrough-infection had a more durable anti-spike-IgG response compared to infection-alone.
A study on healthcare workers from Oregon Health & Science University found enhanced immune responses after vaccination in COVID-19 recovered (hybrid immunity) compared with their naïve-vaccinated peers. However, the effects of post-vaccination breakthrough infections on humoral immune response remain to be determined.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Diagnostics
Subject
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 Three weeks (21 days)
Cite As
Groot, G; Reeder, B; Muhajarine, N; Lee, S; Badea, A; Jagwani, M; Fox, L; Miller, L. What is known about hybrid immunity to COVID-19? 2022 Jun 06, Document no.: INF220501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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