Skip header and navigation

127 records – page 1 of 7.

Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v014 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 16, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v014 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 16, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Oct 16; Document no.: INF031801v014 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST Table)
Similar Reviews
EOC011901 RR
EOC031001 RR
Review History
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
Related Documents
Documents

INF031801v014 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v014 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 16, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v014 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 16, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Updated Key Findings
October 16, 2021
On September 22, 2021, FDA authorized an additional (booster) dose of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine =6 months after completion of the primary series among persons aged =65 years, at high risk for severe COVID-19, or whose occupational or institutional exposure puts them at high risk for COVID-19.
Health Canada has updated the AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria) and Janssen COVID-19 vaccine product monographs to include information on Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome (TTS) or Vaccine-Induced Immune Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia (VITT).
The new SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Risk Assessment published on September 30, 2021 by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) stated that the EU has not yet achieved high enough COVID-19 vaccination coverage in their total populations (only 61.1% vaccinated) to relax restrictions as there is considerable variation in vaccine uptake across countries, resulting in large proportions of the EU/EEA population remaining susceptible to infection.
The ECDC also recommended that: “Vaccination against seasonal influenza, particularly for vulnerable populations and healthcare workers, will be essential to mitigate the impact on individuals and on healthcare systems in the coming months from the potential co-circulation of the two viruses.
Pfizer Inc (PFE.N) said on September 27, 2021, it has started a large study testing its investigational oral antiviral drug for the prevention of COVID-19 infection among those who have been exposed to the virus.
Key Findings
September 24, 2021
The Joint Committee on Vaccinations and immunization (JCVI) in the UK give a precautionary approach regarding vaccination of children aged 12 to 15 years who do not have underlying health conditions.
A prospective study has shown that the use of a booster dose (third dose, 5 months after full vaccination) with Pfizer (BNT162b2) substantially reduces the rate of confirmed COVID-19 infection and severe illness among individuals 60 and older.
Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization released recommendations on September 10th 2021 to provide a third vaccine dose to immunocompromised and populations with serious immunodeficiencies.
The JCVI is advising booster vaccines be offered to those more at risk from serious disease such as residents in care homes, adults aged 50 years or over, frontline HCW, individuals with underlying health conditions and adult household contacts of immunosuppressed individuals.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Immunity
Vaccines
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Hernandez, L; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Oct 16. Document no.: INF031801v014 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 96 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC031801v014 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 13, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC031801v014 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 13, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Epidemiology
Healthcare Services
Subject
Health Planning
Variants
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Asamoah, G; Badea, A; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Miller, L; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the epidemiology of variants and what are the implications for healthcare? 2021 Oct 13. Document no.: EOC031801v014RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Review History
v012 and v013 RR were combined into v013
EOC031801v011 RR: August 27, 2021
v010 and v011 RR were combined into v011
EOC031801v9 RR: August 19, 2021
EOC031801v8 RR: July 12, 2021
EOC031801v7 RR; June 24, 2021
EOC031801v6 RR; June 17, 2021
EOC031801v5 RR; June 2, 2021
EOC031801v4 RR; May 17, 2021
EOC031801v3 RR: May 3, 2021
EOC031801v2 RR: April 20, 2021
EOC031801 RR: March 25, 2021
Related Documents
Documents

EOC031801v014 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC031801v014 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 13, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC031801v014 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
October 13, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
October 13, 2021 - Delta dominance - Delta continues to account for the majority of variants sequenced from surveillance data from Public Health Ontario, Public Health England and ECDC. - Following a Delta outbreak among incarcerated persons in a federal prison, the CDC recommends maintaining multi-component prevention strategies such as testing, masking, prompt medical isolation, and quarantine in congregate settings where physical distancing is challenging, even with a high vaccination rate. - Public Health England reports that unvaccinated people younger than 50 years comprised the highest proportion of attendances to emergency care and deaths due to Delta infection in the UK from 1 February 2021 to 12 September 2021. - CDC surveillance data indicates that unvaccinated people face 11 times the risk of death from Delta variant in the US. - Increased severity of COVID-19 in pregnant individuals has been observed during Delta surge in Dallas County, TX US between August 29, 2021, and September 4, 2021 - A cluster of 59 cases has been linked to a single flight with 146 passengers from New Delhi to Hong Kong in April 2021, despite the 72 hours testing policy. Sequence analysis identified two VOC; Alpha and Delta.
Key Findings
September 17, 2021 - Public Health Ontario reports that COVID-19-related hospitalizations and deaths among children remain low in comparison to the COVID-19-related clinical severity and deaths in adults but advise that policies increasing vaccination rates of children’s contacts such as teachers and parents, will have impacts in reducing pediatric cases. - Public Health Ontario recommend the development of a new vaccine product for a global variant, as ongoing mutations of the SARS-CoV-2 virus mean future Variants of Concern (VOCs) may emerge, including Variants of High Consequence (VOHCs). - A total of 66,413 Delta cases were recorded in Canada as of 09-September-2021, with Alberta recording the highest number of cases with 27,466, Saskatchewan recorded 2,688 cases. - The Alpha variant has now been added to de-escalated variants along with Theta, Eta, Epsilon, Lota, Zeta, and others by the ECDC based on a series of criteria. - A modeling study using 9 mechanistic models projected possible substantial resurgences of COVID-19 across the US from July to December, resulting from the more transmissible Delta variant. - A new variant of COVID-19 called “Mu,” has been reported in the WHO epidemiological update as a “Variant of Interest”.
Category
Epidemiology
Healthcare Services
Subject
Variants
Health Planning
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Asamoah, G; Badea, A; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Hernandez-Ronquillo L; Miller, L; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the epidemiology of variants and what are the implications for healthcare? 2021 Oct 13. Document no.: EOC031801v014 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 45 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Review History
v012 and v013 RR were combined into v013
EOC031801v011 RR: August 27, 2021
v010 and v011 RR were combined into v011
EOC031801v9 RR: August 19, 2021
EOC031801v8 RR: July 12, 2021
EOC031801v7 RR; June 24, 2021
EOC031801v6 RR; June 17, 2021
EOC031801v5 RR; June 2, 2021
EOC031801v4 RR; May 17, 2021
EOC031801v3 RR: May 3, 2021
EOC031801v2 RR: April 20, 2021
EOC031801 RR: March 25, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210902 RR Table
Question Submitted
September 22, 2021
Date Completed
October 7, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210902 RR Table
Question Submitted
September 22, 2021
Date Completed
October 7, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Management
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Decision Making
Health Planning
Infection Prevention and Control
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Related Documents
Documents

EOC210902 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210902 RR
Question Submitted
September 22, 2021
Date Completed
October 7, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210902 RR
Question Submitted
September 22, 2021
Date Completed
October 7, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Emerging evidence suggesting waning levels of immune markers with time, particularly against more virulent variants. How this will correlate to functional immunity is yet to be documented.
Immunocompromised populations with lower levels of responses to standard 2-dose regimens may benefit from a 3rd dose of mRNA vaccine as a part of the primary series, though their response may still be lower than what is expected in the general population
Current recommendation for populations to receive a 3rd dose include adults over a certain age (depending on jurisdiction), those living in long-term care settings, frontline health and social workers and/or people working in high risk settings, those with immune compromising conditions leading to increased risk of severe disease/poor outcomes if infected
Safety trials have indicated that side effects to 3rd/booster doses are similar to those following the 2nd dose in initial vaccination series
Category
Clinical Management
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Decision Making
Health Planning
Infection Prevention and Control
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Tian, K. What is the current evidence and recommendations regarding COVID-19 vaccine booster shots (exceeding 2 doses) for the general population? 2021 Oct 07, Document no.: EOC210902 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210901 RR Table
Question Submitted
September 21, 2021
Date Completed
September 30, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210901 RR Table
Question Submitted
September 21, 2021
Date Completed
September 30, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Face Masks
Pediatrics
Public Health
Schools
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 Three weeks (21 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Howell-Spooner, B; Young, C. What is the evidence for the effectiveness of universal mask use in the pediatric population? 2021 Sep 30, Document no.: EOC210901 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CESTtable).
Related Documents
Documents

EOC210901 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210901 RR
Question Submitted
September 21, 2021
Date Completed
September 30, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210901 RR
Question Submitted
September 21, 2021
Date Completed
September 30, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
September 30, 2021
Studies conducted before mass vaccination campaigns began have reported proper and consistent facemasking by students and staff in school settings are associated with reduced incidence of school-associated transmission or seropositivity.
Fewer studies have reported efficacy of facemasking in the post-mass vaccination period in school settings. The studies available report, however, school-associated transmission were lower, less than 1% secondary attack rate in schools.
Studies of school-associated COVID-19 cases find community exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and/or noncompliance with multiple mitigation measures (e.g. facemask policies, distancing, non-isolation, etc) are key factors of clusters and outbreaks in children.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Face Masks
Public Health
Schools
Pediatrics
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 Three weeks (21 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Howell-Spooner, B; Young, C. What is the evidence for the effectiveness of universal mask use in the pediatric population? 2021 Sep 30, Document no.: EOC210901 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 14 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Ellsworth, C. What are other jurisdictions offering for incentive-based COVID-19? 2021 Aug 24, Document no.: EOC210501v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Related Documents
Documents

EOC210501v2 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
August 18, 2021 - Proof of vaccine “freebies” to customers are slowing - Many vaccine “lotteries” have now ended with prizes being given out, retrospective analysis of vaccine numbers and assumptions regarding causality will likely follow in the near future - More state-sponsored incentives such as partnerships with ride-share companies, childcare centers, etc. - Post-secondary institutions offering incentives mostly in the form of raffles with grand prizes of cash/scholarships for staff/students with proof of vaccination - ESN evidence synthesis found 8 systematic reviews providing some evidence of positive impact of financial incentives with or without other interventions for non-COVID-19 vaccines, 3 reviews found no effect - Several European countries (Greece, France, Italy) mandating vaccination for healthcare workers with refusers facing sanctions/fines/suspensions/job loss - Ontario requiring hospitals, licensed care homes and other high-risk settings such as post-secondary institutions, women’s shelters, youth care facilities, etc. to establish vaccination policies – while vaccination will not likely be mandatory, those who are not vaccinated will be subject to frequent antigen testing. - In Pakistan, the government will be blocking the SIM cards of vaccine refusers, and allowing business to resume in areas with a vaccination rate of greater than 20% - In Indonesia, vaccine refusers will have any social aid suspended and face fines - In the Philippines, the President is threatening to find ways to legalize arresting and forcing vaccination for refusers - A retrospective analysis of vaccination data in Israel found a peak of 2nd dose vaccinations correlating with the exemption of quarantine for vaccinated individuals beginning January 17th, and high rates continued following the day with the highest new daily cases as well as the day of highest fatality rates - Israeli survey of 500 individuals found that 21% of respondents were not intending to vaccinate. The implementation of the ‘Green Pass’ would possibly or definitely convince 31% of respondents, but 46% of respondents indicated that it would not.
Key Findings
May 27, 2021
Vaccine incentives are beginning to emerge in North America in various forms due to a lagging vaccine uptake combined with the threat of SARS-CoV-2 variants
Vaccine incentives range from free items and discounts offered by businesses to customers to financial incentives offered by companies to employees such as paid time off or cash bonuses
Some states/provinces have developed vaccine incentive programs offering large lotteries with cash prizes or scholarship awards, cash incentives or offers for free/discounted entertainment options
Some incentives are specifically geared to high priority populations, for example offering gift cards to anyone within a certain age demographic that receives a vaccine at certain sites, or offering the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine at walk-up vaccination sites in subway stations with the addition of free transit passes
Category
Administration
Subject
Decision Making
Vaccines
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Ellsworth, C. What are other jurisdictions offering for incentive-based COVID-19? 2021 Aug 24, Document no.: EOC210501v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Health Planning
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Young, C. What are the causes of vaccine hesitancy? What programs/approaches have been successful in reducing vaccine hesitancy? 2021 Aug 17. Document no.: EOC012201v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Review History
EOC012201v2 RR: May 10, 2021
EOC012201 RR: February 1, 2021
Related Documents
Documents

EOC012201v3 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
August 17, 2021
New search completed August 17, 2021 containing 8 grey literature sources and 51 published journal articles including preprints.
Review of new search resulted in conformation of previously compiled information, relevant evidences and updates have been added to evidence table to reflect updated review.
Vaccine hesitancy was most commonly found in females and pregnant women as males generally showed greater willingness towards vaccine uptake.
Regardless of country and phase of the pandemic, there were evidences of widespread mistrust in the healthcare system and the governments with speed of vaccine development and approval. The greatest impact was seen in minority groups and people of colour.
Significant uptake of vaccination is due to the tailored recommendation of health provider in hesitant population, this has reinforced the importance of vaccination and also promoted vaccination of children with hesitant parents.
Previous vaccination has a positive influence on covid 19 vaccine uptake, (most popularly with influenza vaccine)
Higher age and underlying conditions/vulnerability to diseases along with employment and retirement had significantly lower vaccine hesitancy.
Greater financial incentives were some of the modifying of attitudes towards vaccination.
Social media and internet had mixed impact on hesitancy- restriction of certain vaccines had a direct impact on vaccination uptake whereas some reinforced confidence.
Key Findings
May 10, 2021
New search completed April 19, 2021 containing 29 grey literature sources and 128 published articles
Review of new search resulted in confirmation of previously compiled information, review update deemed not necessary at this time, relevant evidence has been added to the evidence table to reflect updated review February 1, 2021
Vaccine hesitancy towards the COVID vaccine varies from 2% to 44% in the general population, depending on country, phase of pandemic and specific population
Vaccine hesitancy tends to be lower in healthcare workers than the general population, but still exists at rates up to 56%, again, dependent on the country of residence and phase of the pandemic
The most commonly cited reasons for vaccine hesitancy are concerns about the efficacy and safety, largely due to the expedited testing/approval process
Country of residence and corresponding trust in government/pharmaceutical industries can have a significant role in vaccine acceptance
Strategies to increase vaccine uptake should range from personal-level interventions such as patient education materials to health system level interventions such as healthcare provider training and targeted population vaccine acceptance campaigns
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Health Planning
Vaccination
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Young, C. What are the causes of vaccine hesitancy? What programs/approaches have been successful in reducing vaccine hesitancy? 2021 Aug 17 Document no.: EOC012201v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Review History
EOC012201v2 RR: May 10, 2021
EOC012201 RR: February 1, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM210602 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM210602 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Long Covid
Health Planning
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Community
Emergency
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
McLean, M; Williams-Roberts, H; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Ellsworth, C. What are long COVID's demands on the healthcare system, and its severity of the illness? 2021 Jul 12, Document no.: EPM210602 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Related Documents
Documents

EPM210602 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM210602 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM210602 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Key Findings
Long COVID-19 is likely to increase healthcare demands across the health system, including emergency departments, hospital admissions, primary care visits, specialists appointments, and home care and rehabilitation services.
The clinical care burden of long COVID-19 is the greatest in the first 3 months after testing and is likely to place the greatest demand on primary care services.
Patients with severe COVID-19 illness are more likely to place longer-term demands (4-6 months) on specialist care due to respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, metabolic, psychiatric and unspecified conditions.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Long Covid
Health Planning
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Community
Emergency
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
McLean, M; Williams-Roberts, H; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Ellsworth, C. What are long COVID's demands on the healthcare system, and its severity of the illness? 2021 Jul 12, Document no.: EPM210602 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 23 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM210601 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 9, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EPM210601 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 9, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Key Findings
The frequency of Long COVID symptoms varies widely across studies based on populations studied, duration of follow up and methods of assessment of symptoms.
It is estimated that 1 in 50 persons experience Long COVID symptoms after 12 weeks; however, higher estimates up to 80% have been reported in studies with a greater proportion of persons who were previously hospitalized. A recent study of a mixed cohort of 96 persons found that only 22.9% had no symptoms at 12 months post diagnosis.
A wide range of symptoms affecting multiple organ systems has been reported. For many persons symptoms improve over time while others experience persistent and/or new symptoms. Among studies with the longest duration of follow up, the most frequently reported symptoms included fatigue (up to 65%), dyspnea (up to 50%), headache (up to 45%), anosmia/ageusia (up to 25%), cognitive memory/concentration (up to 39.6%) and sleep disorders (up to 26%).
Few studies estimated the duration of symptoms with estimates ranging from 2.2% for 6 months and 27% for 7-9 months.
The mechanism(s) leading to Long COVID remain unclear but those experiencing post acute sequelae tend to be older, have a greater number of symptoms during the acute phase of illness or manifest specific symptoms and live with multiple comorbid conditions such as obesity.
The lack of consensus on a definition of Long COVID contributes to marked variations in robust prevalence estimates.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Long Covid
Symptoms
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Community
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Ellsworth, C. What is the incidence and duration of Long COVID cases? 2021 Jul 09, Document no.: EPM210601 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 19 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM210601 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 9, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EPM210601 RR Table
Question Submitted
June 22, 2021
Date Completed
July 9, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Epidemiology & Modelling
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Long Covid
Symptoms
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Community
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Ellsworth, C. What is the incidence and duration of Long COVID cases? 2021 Jul 09; Document no.: EPM210601 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Related Documents
Documents

EPM210601 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210503 RR
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210503 RR
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Requiring proof of vaccination for entry into another country is not a new idea. There are regulations that need to be followed to set up a “vaccine passport” in relation to international travel (International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005))
At present the World Health Organization does not recommend vaccine passports for international travel, but they are working on a standard Smart Vaccination Certificate technical specification and standards to allow for harmonised processes to include COVID-19 vaccines into an updated version of the IHR (2005)
Countries around the world are beginning to put vaccine passports into place for international travel, as well as in some countries within country travel and access to services or businesses including Israel, France, Italy, Denmark, and the EU
The Canadian Federal government is supportive of a vaccine passport for international travel but recognize the issuing of vaccine passports will need to be province led
As of May 13, 2021, the province of Quebec has begun issuing a downloadable QR code that individual can keep on their smart phone.
As of June 9, 2021, the Federal government of Canada discussed easing restrictions for fully vaccinated Canadian citizens returning to the country
Ethical considerations in the use of vaccine passports include equitable access to vaccination (domestically and internationally), access to technology (eg. Smartphone passports), marginalization, or stigmatization especially among historically racialized groups, and socially isolated populations
Legal considerations include o Clarifying who has the legal authority to require proof of vaccination, o Ensuring that if new legislation is created and implemented it is in line with all pre-existing legislation (Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Human Rights Codes, privacy legislation, employment legislation), o Ensuring that, if created by the government, there is coordination of the Provincial and Federal governments for international travel with respect to jurisdictional overlap, security of information, fraud
Health care facilities should be able to legally enact vaccination policies for patient-facing employees so long as they allow for exemptions due to medical inability or bona fide religious, or conscientious beliefs
Six in ten Canadians (61%) expect vaccine passports to be widely used in Canada by the end of 2021, the same proportion (61%) of Canadians also agreed that only vaccinated people should be allowed to engage in events involving larger crowds such as public transit, air travel, or attending cultural and sports events
Category
Administration
Subject
Ethics
Decision Making
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Lashta E, von Tigerstrom B, Reeder B, Groot G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the ethical/legal aspects of vaccine requirements? 2021 Jun 21, Document no.: EOC210503 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 25 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210503 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210503 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Lashta E, von Tigerstrom B, Reeder B, Groot G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the ethical/legal aspects of vaccine requirements? 2021 Jun 21, Document no.: EOC210503 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST Table).
Related Documents
Documents

EOC210503 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Only agreed upon contraindications against COVID-19 vaccination is for individuals with a history of allergic reactions to a component of the vaccine or an allergic reaction to a previous dose
Where allergies to components exist, vaccination with an alternative COVID-19 vaccine should be considered
Autoimmune conditions and treatments are not considered contraindications, however timing of vaccines in relation to treatment regimens should be considered
Category
Administration
Subject
Vaccination
Decision Making
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Young, C; Ellsworth, C. What are legitimate exemptions/contraindications for COVID-19 vaccines from a medical point of view? 2021 Jun 10, Document no.: EOC210502 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210502 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210502 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Young, C; Ellsworth, C. What are legitimate exemptions/contraindications for COVID-19 vaccines from a medical point of view? 2021 Jun 10, Document no.: EOC210502 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Related Documents
Documents

EOC210502 RR Table

Download File
Less detail

127 records – page 1 of 7.