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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC082502 RR
Question Submitted
August 25, 2020
Date Completed
August 29, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC082502 RR
Question Submitted
August 25, 2020
Date Completed
August 29, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Infrared thermometers detect the infrared waves emitted by an object and convert into an electrical signal to display the distribution of temperature · Infrared thermometers do not emit radiation, however many are equipped with a laser tracker beam, similar to that found in television remote controls · The Pineal Gland is located deep inside the brain, separated from the forehead by the presence of the skull and several centimeters of brain tissue
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Infrared Thermometers
Screening
Public Health
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Ellsworth, C; Fox, L. Is there evidence of risks for using infrared thermometers? 2020 Aug 29; Document no.: EOC082502 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 12 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC090201 RR
Question Submitted
September 2, 2020
Date Completed
September 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC090201 RR
Question Submitted
September 2, 2020
Date Completed
September 4, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Temperature screening has not yet been demonstrated to reduce COVID-19 spread or accurately identify COVID-19 cases in schools. This did not prove to be a useful strategy when implemented in Singapore during the 2003 SARS epidemic. · 14% to 19% of children with COVID-19 have an asymptomatic presentation and fever only develops in less than half of symptomatic pediatric cases. Fever is also a common presentation of childhood illnesses unrelated to COVID-19. · Chemical and plastic-strip thermometers are considered unreliable in pediatric clinical settings and there is also an element of user error with any thermometer type.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Screening
Schools
Population
All Pediatrics
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Radu, L; Groot, G; Badea, A; Mueller, M; Young, C. Is the use of thermometers an effective screening strategy for students in schools during COVID-19? 2020 Sep 4; Document no.: EOC090201 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 13 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012601 RR
Question Submitted
January 26, 2021
Date Completed
February 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012601 RR
Question Submitted
January 26, 2021
Date Completed
February 12, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Studies suggest that antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests (Ag-RDTs) can be used in a population level with high prevalence of COVID-19 disease where health systems are overwhelmed or where nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) such as real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) are not available. · The Canadian COVID-19 Testing and Screening Expert Advisory Panel recommends the use of frequent screening with rapid diagnostic tests in selected groups to limit outbreaks. · WHO and European Center for Disease Prevention and Control recommend using Ag-RDTs with high sensitivity and specificity when NAATs are not available or turnaround time negatively affects NAATs’ clinical utility. For example, COVID-19 Ag-RDTs can be used to surveil health care workers or residents of congregate dwellings during outbreaks or when community transmission rates are high, to screen at-risk individuals to support outbreak investigations, or to screen suspected COVID-19 outbreaks in early stages in settings where NAATs are not available. · WHO does not recommend Ag-RDTs usage when expected prevalence is low (e.g., screening at points of entry) unless an Ag-RDT’s specificity is high (>99%). · Studies have shown that Panbio™ COVID-19 Ag Test (Abbott) can have overall sensitivity of 72.6% to 95.2% and specificity of 98.0% to 100% and suggest that this test is appropriate for contagious case identification and asymptomatic case screening, especially in high prevalence (>5%) settings. · WHO recommends that iterative Ag-RDT testing or confirmatory rRT-PCR testing be done in symptomatic patients or asymptomatic contacts of COVID-19 cases since a negative Ag-RDT result cannot completely exclude an active COVID-19 infection. · Challenges of population level testing (whether they succeed or fail) such as required logistics and resources (e.g., immunizers, access to Ag-RDTs and equipment), performance accuracy of Ag-RDTs (e.g., false positive or negative rates in real world settings), and public trust and engagement in testing and future measures (e.g., vaccine uptake) are yet to be considered.
Category
Diagnostics
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Antigens
Asymptomatic
Screening
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Azizian, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Hamula, C; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C. How effective is surveillance antigenic testing? 2021 Feb 12; Document no.: EOC012601 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 32 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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