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42 records – page 1 of 3.

Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC032401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 24, 2020
Date Completed
March 24, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC032401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 24, 2020
Date Completed
March 24, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Immunity
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M. What is the risk of reinfection from COVID-19? 2020 Mar 24; Document no.: EOC032401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 3 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
EOC032401v2 RR: August 1, 2020
EOC032401 RR: May 14, 2020
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040701v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 7, 2020
Date Completed
May 8, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040701v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 7, 2020
Date Completed
May 8, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
COVID-19 is primarily transmitted by symptomatic patientsand presymptomatic individuals.·Moderate grade evidence estimates that approximately 20% of COVID-19 transmission may bedue to that from presymptomatic individuals.However, estimates range from 6.4% -47%.·Asymptomatic individuals and environmental contaminationappear to contributelessto disease transmission,with estimated proportionsof 6% and 10%, respectivelyfrom modelling studies
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Transmission
Symptoms
Symptomatic
Asymptomatic
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Wang, H; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; What proportion of disease transmission is due to asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic cases? 2020 May 8; Document no.: LAB040701v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 12 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Similar Reviews
EPM051301 RR
Review History
LAB040701 RR: April 7, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB040701v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 7, 2020
Date Completed
May 8, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB040701v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 7, 2020
Date Completed
May 8, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Category
Clinical Presentation
Epidemiology
Subject
Transmission
Symptoms
Symptomatic
Asymptomatic
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B. What proportion of disease transmission is due to asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic cases? 2020 May 8; Document no.: LAB040701v2-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 25 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
LAB040701 RR: April 7, 2020
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LAB040701v2-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041601v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB041601v2 RR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 19, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
Patients with higher and prolonged IgM antibodies are associated with more severe illness, poor recovery, and prolonged viral shedding (some patients may shed virus for more than 30 days).
Patients who respond weakly to IgG have higher viral clearance rate than strong responders.
There were no reports with direct information regarding infectiousness of patients.
Category
Diagnostics
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Transmission
Antibodies
Natural History
Population
All
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Reeder, B; Duncan, V. What is the relationship between antibody development and viral shedding and infectiousness? 2020 May 19; Document no.: LAB041601v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
LAB041601 RR: April 16, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB041601v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 22, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB041601v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 16, 2020
Date Completed
May 22, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Category
Diagnostics
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Transmission
Antibodies
Natural History
Population
All
Cite As
Duncan, V; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the relationship between antibody development and viral shedding and infectiousness? 2020 May 22; Document no.: LAB041601v2-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 30 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
LAB041601 RR: April 16, 2020
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LAB041601v2-01 ESR

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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB040802v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
June 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LAB040802v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
June 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Category
Diagnostics
Administration
Subject
Testing
Serology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Health Personnel
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Duncan, V; Howell-Spooner, B. What proportion of healthcare workers are rt-PCR positive and IgM or IgG positive? 2020 Jun 2; Document no.: LAB040802v3-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 22 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
LAB040802v2 RR: May 19, 2020
LAB040802 RR: April 9, 2020
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LAB040802v3-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040802v3 RR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
June 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LAB040802v3 RR
Question Submitted
April 8, 2020
Date Completed
June 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Laboratory
Key Findings
Several references provide estimates of the proportion of HCW infected with SARS-CoV2 that range from 0.9% -20%. A recent review from Alberta Health Services that examined the COVID-19 rt-PCR test results among HCW indicates that in that province 2.4% of physicians and 0.9% of non-MD HCW who were tested were positive for SARS-CoV-2 compared to 3.5% of the general population.
In the studies reviewed, the majority of cases are confirmed by RT-PCR, while only one reference also used serology testing.
Category
Diagnostics
Administration
Subject
Testing
Serology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Health Personnel
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Reeder, B; Duncan, V; Howell-Spooner, B. What proportion of healthcare workers are rt-PCR positive and IgM or IgG positive? 2020 Jun 2; Document no.: LAB040802v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
LAB040802v2 RR: May 19, 2020
LAB040802 RR: April 9, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC070201v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 7, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC070201v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 7, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Transmission
Symptoms
Natural History
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Ellsworth, C. What is the transmissibility and epidemiology of COVID-19 in children and adolescents? 2020 Aug 7; Document no.: EOC070201v2-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 29 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
EOC070201 RR: July 22, 2020
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EOC070201v2-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC070201v2 RR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC070201v2 RR
Question Submitted
July 2, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
AUGUST 7th UPDATE: No new studies examining secondary attack rates of pediatric index cases were found. Studies continue to suggest low transmission from pediatric cases, and high proportion of pediatric cases being asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic.
Key Findings
· Pediatric cases of COVID-19 constitute between 1% to 10% of all confirmed cases of COVID-19; variation exists by jurisdiction. · Few case reports exist of confirmed child-to-other transmission. Contact tracing studies suggest that children are unlikely to be transmitters of the disease. Households are the most likely environments for transmission. · A recent large South Korean contact tracing study however (in pre-print) found that household COVID-19 transmission rates for children age 10-19 were significantly higher than in adults; transmission rates for children age 0-9 were relatively low.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Transmission
Symptoms
Natural History
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Groot, G; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What is the transmissibility and epidemiology of COVID-19 in children and adolescents? 2020 Aug 14; Document no.: EOC070201v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 12 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC070201 RR: July 22, 2020
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Document Type
Supplementary
Review Code
EOC081401 SR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Supplementary
Review Code
EOC081401 SR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Saskatchewan
Reopening
Schools
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Muhajarine N, McRae D, Pisolkar V, et al. Saskatchewan’s school re-opening plan in comparison to other provincial plans and federal recommendations. 2020 Aug 14; Document no.: EOC081401 SR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 34 p. (CEST Summary Report)
Review History
EOC081401 RR: August 24, 2020
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC032401v3 RR
Question Submitted
March 24, 2020
Date Completed
November 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC032401v3 RR
Question Submitted
March 24, 2020
Date Completed
November 2, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Emerging evidence indicates that there may be a possibility of re-infection with SARS-CoV-2
Several cases with genomic sequencing have found variant strains in re-infection cases
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Immunity
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Badea, A; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Dalidowicz, M. What is the risk of reinfection from COVID-19? 2020 Nov 2; Document no.: EOC032401v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 13 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC032401v2 RR: August 1, 2020
EOC032401 RR: May 14, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC081401v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
November 27, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC081401v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
November 27, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Aerosols
Facilities
Decision Making
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Miller, L. (Update) What are the recommendations around settling times following aerosol generating procedures on suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients? 2020 Nov 27; Document no.: EOC081401v2-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 14 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
EOC081401 RR: August 24, 2020
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EOC081401v2-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC081401v2 RR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC081401v2 RR
Question Submitted
August 14, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
In the absence of SARS-CoV-2 specific evidence, recommendations for fallow time following AGPs in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic range widely depending on country and specialty association.
The majority of recommendations are based upon dental practices and several on thoracic surgical practice.
The most common recommendations follow the CDC’s guidelines for airborne contamination removal based on air changes per hour ventilation properties of rooms.
Assuming that most treatment rooms have a minimum of 10-12 ACH, most associations recommend a 20-minute fallow periods, or 60 minutes if ACH is unknown or below recommendations for treatment rooms.
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Aerosols
Facilities
Decision Making
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot G; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C; Miller, L. What are the recommendations around settling times following aerosol generating procedures on suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients? 2020 Dec 1; Document no.: EOC081401v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 24 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC081401 RR: August 24, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC062301v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 23, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC062301v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 23, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Personal Protective Equipment
Face Masks
Public Health
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Young, C. What is the evidence for the effectiveness of universal mask use by the public? 2020 Dec 1; Document no.: EOC062301v3-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 67 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
EOC062301 RR: August 9, 2020
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EOC062301v3-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062301v3 RR
Question Submitted
June 23, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062301v3 RR
Question Submitted
June 23, 2020
Date Completed
December 1, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Systematic reviews indicate there is a growing evidence in support of a correlation between mask use and lowered risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection
Case-control and observational studies have demonstrated a positive effect on community transmission rates
Masks provide the greatest community impact when implemented early, adherence is high and when combined with social distancing and hand hygiene
Individual protection is largely impacted by mask material and fit
Mask use is considered an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, other non-pharmaceutical public health measures (social distancing, hand-washing)
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Personal Protective Equipment
Face Masks
Public Health
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Howell-Spooner, B; Young, C. What is the evidence for the effectiveness of universal mask use by the public? 2020 Dec 1; Document no.: EOC062301v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 33 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC062301 RR: August 9, 2020
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF090101v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 1, 2020
Date Completed
December 29, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF090101v3-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 1, 2020
Date Completed
December 29, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Immunity
Risk
Population
All adults
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Young, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the duration of immunity for COVID-19 in previously infected patients? 2020 Dec 29; Document no.: INF090101v3-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 39 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
INF090101 RR: September 13, 2020
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INF090101v3-01 ESR

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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF123001-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 30, 2020
Date Completed
December 31, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF123001-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 30, 2020
Date Completed
December 31, 2020
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Subject
Variants
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. What is the R0 (basic reproduction number) of the new coronavirus variant detected in the UK? 2020 Dec 31; Document no.: INF123001-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 8 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
INF123001 RR: January 4, 2021
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC062201v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 4, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC062201v2-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 4, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Comorbidities
Chemotherapy
Cancer
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Miller, L.; Mueller, M. What are the differences in the clinical course of COVID-19 between patients undergoing chemotherapy and otherwise healthy individuals? 2021 Jan 4; Document no.: EOC062201v2 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 46 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Review History
EOC062201 RR: June 29, 2020
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EOC062201v2-01 ESR

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF090101v2 RR
Question Submitted
September 1, 2020
Date Completed
January 20, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF090101v2 RR
Question Submitted
September 1, 2020
Date Completed
January 20, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
· First confirmed case of reinfection documented in a 33 year-old man in Hong Kong, who was first infected with the virus in March, and again while on holiday in Spain four and a half months later – though asymptomatic for both infections · Genetic sequencing has identified a small number of reinfection cases with different strains · No concrete evidence on the presence and/or duration of immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in humans · Demonstration of PCR positivity does not necessarily indicate continued or renewed infection; it may indicate the presence of a dead virus. · In-vitro analyses have documented the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in convalescent samples up to eight months post infection · Only one small study in rhesus monkeys recovered from SARS-CoV-2 were not re-infected when re-challenged with SARS-CoV-2 upon recovery · Many cases series of previously recovered SARS-CoV-2 patients re-testing positive following clinical and pathological recovery, but virus has been unable to be cultured from those patients, most remain asymptomatic and there have been no documented secondary cases arising from patients following positive re-tests
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Immunity
Risk
Population
All adults
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Badea, A; Lee, S; Groot, G; Takaya, S; Dalidowicz, M; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the duration of immunity for COVID-19 in previously infected patients? 2021 Jan 20; Document no.: INF090101v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 26 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
INF090101 RR: September 13, 2020
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Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC062201v2 RR
Question Submitted
June 22, 2020
Date Completed
January 22, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer. However, more data are beginning to elucidate the nuances of these risks depending on patient specific factors.
Limited data indicate that pediatric cancer patients are not at a high level of risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19.
Limited evidence indicates some differences in the course and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection depending on the type of immunosuppressive therapy a patient receives.
Key Findings
Generally speaking, data indicate that adult cancer patients and those who have recently received or are receiving anti-cancer therapy are at a higher risk of severe outcomes and death resulting from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer.
Pediatric cancer populations may not be at the same level of risk as adult populations.
There is not enough evidence at this time to determine if there are differences in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients receiving chemotherapy vs. those who are not aside from outcomes and severity.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Chemotherapy
Cancer
Comorbidities
Natural History
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Groot, G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the differences in the clinical course of COVID-19 between patients undergoing chemotherapy and otherwise healthy individuals? 2021 Jan 22; Document no.: EOC062201v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
EOC062201 RR: June 29, 2020
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42 records – page 1 of 3.