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48 records – page 1 of 5.

Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Council" has been working within their community(ies) in some fashion to distribute health information
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
provide updates and guidelines for community living, running of daily activities and use of community
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
The Hutterian Safety Council has established a COVID-19 taskforce to provide guidance for communities to best prevent and cope with COVID-19
Only one published study has investigated the prevalence of coronaviruses in relation to influenza vaccination/infection in Hutterite populations. This study found that coronaviruses are much less prevalent than influenza, entero/rhinoviruses and pediatric RSV and that it occurred in all age groups.
This study also found a high degree of co-circulation of other respiratory viruses along with influenza, which invites the questioning of signs/symptoms falsely attributed to influenza and therefore influencing empiric use of antivirals
Most studies available focus on influenza, polio and other common vaccine-preventable childhood communicable disease
One study assessing influenza in Hutterite populations found that the immunization of children and adolescents led to a protective effect among the community over multiple years of seasonal influenza and provided ~60% herd protection
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Okpalauwaekwe, U; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v017 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Dr. Bruce Reeder, Community Health and Epidemiology Department, College of Medicine, University
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v017 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Nov 26; Document no.: INF031801v017 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST Table)
Similar Reviews
EOC011901 RR
EOC031001 RR
Review History
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
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INF031801v017 RR Table

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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v017 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 12, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
community response-ie, timing of lockdown, timing of reopening, etc.-and disease outbreak indicators-ie
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v017 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 12, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Immunity
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Miller, L., Howell-Spooner, B.. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Nov 12. Document no.: INF031801v017 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 70 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Review History
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v017 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
in community dwellings 67% (95% CI 57-75) for B.1.17, and 61% (95% CI 45- 72) for P.1 (133) Alpha (B
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v017 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Updated Key Findings
November 16, 2021
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that any individuals who develop myocarditis/pericarditis after a dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine should defer receiving a subsequent dose until additional safety data are available.
On 9th November, 2021, the CDC allows mix and match of booster shots in USA.
National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommended boosters for other high-risk groups, including people 70 years of age and older and front-line health care workers who had a short period of time between their first two shots.
NACI also recommended boosters for people who received two doses of the Astra Zeneca vaccine, as the mRNA vaccines appear to offer better protection.
On 4th November, 2021, the United Kingdom became the first country to approve Pfizer’s competitorOK competitor Merck's COVID-19 pill, which is already under review at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) after showing strong initial results. Other antivirals are under consideration including an agent from Pfizer (Paxlovid). While promising, caution should be taken with interpreting data from oral antivirals as currently, no published data exist and much conclusions are drawn off grey literature .
India’s Covaxin covid 19 vaccine by Bharat Biotech reported a vaccine effectiveness of 77.8% from a clinical trial. , 2021, a CDC reported vaccine efficacy of 90.9% with primary data from one phase II/III clinical trial in preventing symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in children aged 5–11 years with or without evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Key Findings
November 2, 2021
October 21st, 2021 Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech announced results from a Phase 3 randomized, controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of a 30-µg booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 with a relative vaccine efficacy of 95.6%.
On 21st October, 2021, the advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said people who received Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) COVID-19 vaccines should receive a booster dose, and should continue with the original vaccine they recieved.
NACI’s latest guidelines suggest provinces should offer boosters to Canadians who received two doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) vaccine advisory group on 26th October 2021 approved the emergency use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11 at a reduced dosage from the stanard dosing available for those over 12.
Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australia) has provisionally approved a third dose of the Pfizer (Comirnaty) vaccine for individuals 18 years or older. Pfizer (Comirnaty) is recommended as a single booster dose, irrespective of the primary COVID-19 vaccine used.
On 29th October, 2021, NACI issued new guidance "strongly" recommending booster shots for seniors 80 and older.
A survey at University of Oxford, UK, found that social media played a part in children aged 9 to 18 being more undecided than their older counterparts.
A report by the CDC found that the effectiveness of 2 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against COVID-19 hospitalization was 93% during the period of B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant dominance among children and adolescents aged 12–18 years.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Immunity
Clinical Presentation
Infection Prevention and Control
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Hernandez, L; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Nov 26. Document no.: INF031801v017 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 96 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v018 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
(SARS-CoV-2) case rates and viral diversity among health care workers (HCWs) during a high community
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v018 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
November 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Immunity
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Miller, L. & Howell-Spooner, B.. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Nov 26, Document no.: INF031801v018 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 53 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Review History
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
Related Documents
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH):  CADTH COVID-19 Webinar - Community-Based Aerosol
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST evidence search report)
Related Documents
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Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
/12/routes- transmission-covid-19.pdf?la=en CADTH COVID-19 Webinar - Community-Based Aerosol
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
· A recent evidence synthesis was completed by Public Health Ontario to answer a similar question. That synthesis has been deemed of sufficiently high quality and contains a recent enough evidence review to provide the necessary information to answer the question. Please refer to the attached document for the Key Points · We have reviewed the literature identified by our search that has been published since the time of the literature review in the Public Health Ontario evidence synthesis (i.e., between Oct 14, 2020 and Dec 15, 2020). No significant changes to the Key Points are noted. · Our team agrees with the conclusion of Public Health Ontario that the dominant mechanism of transmission is primarily through direct contact with respiratory droplets but that COVID-19 is an opportunistic airborne Rapid Review Report: INF121501 RR (Version 1: December 17, 2020 17:30) 2 pathogen, where aerosol transmission occurs under the right combination of conditions (for instance a poorly ventilated space where a high volume of virus can be produced and concentrated).
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF121501 RR Table
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
COVID-19 Webinar - Community-Based Aerosol Transmission Of COVID-19 and HVAC Systems. [3 December, 2020
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF121501 RR Table
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 17; Document no.: INF121501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. (CEST table)
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INF121501 RR Table

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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC011901-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
the scientific community to develop swiftly a safe and effective vaccine. Notwithstanding the limitations
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC011901-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Risk
Infection Prevention and Control
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Mueller, M.; Young, C. How safe are the Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations? 2021 Jan 21; Document no.: EOC011901-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 31 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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48 records – page 1 of 5.