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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC220301 ESR
Question Submitted
March 1, 2022
Date Completed
March 11, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
hesitancy in patients with mental illness: strategies to overcome barriers-a review. J Egypt Public Health
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC220301 ESR
Question Submitted
March 1, 2022
Date Completed
March 11, 2022
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Miller, L. Do motivational interviewing (MI) techniques effectively address vaccine hesitancy? 2022 Mar 11, Document no.: EOC220301 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 30 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
: Brianna Howell-Spooner, Lukas Miller REQUESTOR: David Torr, Interim Lead SHA Public Health
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
posts, public health service announcements, and infographic messages. • The Hutterite colonies also
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
The Hutterian Safety Council has established a COVID-19 taskforce to provide guidance for communities to best prevent and cope with COVID-19
Only one published study has investigated the prevalence of coronaviruses in relation to influenza vaccination/infection in Hutterite populations. This study found that coronaviruses are much less prevalent than influenza, entero/rhinoviruses and pediatric RSV and that it occurred in all age groups.
This study also found a high degree of co-circulation of other respiratory viruses along with influenza, which invites the questioning of signs/symptoms falsely attributed to influenza and therefore influencing empiric use of antivirals
Most studies available focus on influenza, polio and other common vaccine-preventable childhood communicable disease
One study assessing influenza in Hutterite populations found that the immunization of children and adolescents led to a protective effect among the community over multiple years of seasonal influenza and provided ~60% herd protection
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Okpalauwaekwe, U; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH011401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 15, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
in Hebrew Public Health Agency of Canada  Vaccines and Treatments for COVID-19: Vaccine Rollout
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH011401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 15, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Health Planning
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Mueller, M; Howell-Spooner, B. How are other jurisdictions distributing COVID-19 vaccines in non-healthcare worker environments and what is the rationale for those distribution models? 2021 Jan 15; Document no.: PH011401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH011401 RR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 19, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
vaccination. The Public Health Agency of Canada3 suggests that jurisdictions should plan for alternate
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH011401 RR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 19, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
· Recommended to use existing vaccination structures and delivery services as much as possible for distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines · Important to consider cold-chain requirements when developing distribution plans · Should consider alternate locations for hard-to-reach populations that are easily accessible and familiar · Consider branching out to mobile vaccination (e.g. home visits, door-to-door), pharmacies, workplaces, congregate living facilities, walk-up/drive-through mechanisms for vaccine delivery
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Health Planning
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Howell-Spooner, B. How are other jurisdictions distributing COVID-19 vaccines in non-healthcare worker environments and what is the rationale for those distribution models? 2021 Jan 19; Document no.: PH011401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 17 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v019 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
December 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
recipients aged 5–11 years. 16-Nov-21 Government Public Health Ontario • Myocarditis and Pericarditis after
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF031801v019 RR Table
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
December 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Hernandez, L; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Dec 26; Document no.: INF031801v019 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST Table)
Similar Reviews
EOC011901 RR
EOC031001 RR
Review History
INF031801v17 RR: November 23, 2021
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
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INF031801v019 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v019 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
December 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
) and the Quebec National Institute of Public Health (INSPQ) shows that the strategy to delay and mix second doses
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF031801v019 RR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
December 26, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Updated Key Findings
December 14, 2021
Ontario Immunization Advisory Committee recommended that if an 11 and 12-year-old child is inadvertently given a second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine that is not authorized for their age, the dose should be considered valid and the series complete.
National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends that a booster dose of an authorized mRNA COVID-19 vaccine should be offered to vulnerable population and > 50 years old, =6 months after completion of a primary COVID-19 vaccine series.
Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunization (ATAGI) recommends COVID-19 booster vaccination with either Pfizer (Comirnaty) or Moderna (Spikevax), which are considered equally acceptable, for anyone aged 18 and older who completed their primary course of COVID-19 vaccination 5 or more months ago.
On December 8th, 2021 in a press release by Pfizer-BioNTech said that preliminary laboratory studies demonstrate that three doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine neutralize the Omicron variant while two doses show significantly reduced neutralization titers. Data indicate that a third dose of BNT162b2 increases the neutralizing antibody titers by 25-fold compared to two doses.
Key Findings
December 3, 2021
The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has granted provisional approval to Moderna for the use of its vaccine in children (two 10µg doses) and as booster shot for adults (one 30µg dose) in preparation for the recent emergence of the Omicron variant. This is in addition to Pfizer, which was also recently approved.
The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends that a complete series with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (10 mcg) may be offered to children 5-11 years of age who do not have contraindications to the vaccine, with a dosing interval of at least 8 weeks between the first and second dose.
NNACI also recommends that children aged 5-11 years with a history of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection should be considered no longer infectious and symptoms of an acute illness should be completely resolved prior to vaccination.
Health Canada has authorized Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine (also known as Spikevax) to be used as a booster shot, using a half-dose of the vaccine.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Lee, S; Shumilak, G; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Hernandez, L; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2021 Dec 26. Document no.: INF031801v019 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 93 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Review History
INF031801v17 RR: November 23, 2021
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v020 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
January 14, 2022
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
-doses/guidance-booster-covid-19-vaccine-doses.pdf o Librarian’s Note: Pg 9 Public Health Ontario
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF031801v020 ESR
Question Submitted
March 18, 2021
Date Completed
January 14, 2022
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Infection Prevention and Control
Clinical Presentation
Immunity
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
ICU
Medicine Unit
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Miller, L., Howell-Spooner, B. How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? 2022 Jan 14, Document no.: INF031801v020 ESR . In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 9 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Similar Reviews
EOC220304
Review History
INF031801v17 RR: November 23, 2021
INF031801v16 RR: November 12, 2021
INF031801v15 RR: October 28, 2021
INF031801v014 RR: October 16, 2021
INF031801v013 RR: September 24, 2021
INF031801v012 RR: September 10, 2021
INF031801v010 RR: August 25, 2021
INF031801v9 RR: August 23, 2021
INF031801v8 RR: August 9, 2021
INF031801v7 RR: July 20, 2021
INF031801v6 RR: July 2, 2021
INF031801v5 RR: June 22, 2021
INF031801v4 RR: June 3, 2021
INF031801v3 RR: May 24, 2021
INF031801v2 RR: May 14, 2021
INF031801 RR: March 31, 2021
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Health Authority NSW Health (Aus) Public Health Ontario LIMITS/EXCLUSIONS/INCLUSIONS: English
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
synthesis was completed by Public Health Ontario to answer a similar question. That synthesis has been
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
· A recent evidence synthesis was completed by Public Health Ontario to answer a similar question. That synthesis has been deemed of sufficiently high quality and contains a recent enough evidence review to provide the necessary information to answer the question. Please refer to the attached document for the Key Points · We have reviewed the literature identified by our search that has been published since the time of the literature review in the Public Health Ontario evidence synthesis (i.e., between Oct 14, 2020 and Dec 15, 2020). No significant changes to the Key Points are noted. · Our team agrees with the conclusion of Public Health Ontario that the dominant mechanism of transmission is primarily through direct contact with respiratory droplets but that COVID-19 is an opportunistic airborne Rapid Review Report: INF121501 RR (Version 1: December 17, 2020 17:30) 2 pathogen, where aerosol transmission occurs under the right combination of conditions (for instance a poorly ventilated space where a high volume of virus can be produced and concentrated).
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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93 records – page 1 of 10.