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41 records – page 1 of 5.

Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH011401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 15, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Date: January 15, 2021 Subject(s): Vaccines, Decision Making, Health Planning. Cite As: Mueller, M
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH011401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 15, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Health Planning
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Mueller, M; Howell-Spooner, B. How are other jurisdictions distributing COVID-19 vaccines in non-healthcare worker environments and what is the rationale for those distribution models? 2021 Jan 15; Document no.: PH011401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH011401 RR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 19, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
#ational decision making or organi#ational decision-making or ((organi#ational or administrative
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH011401 RR
Question Submitted
January 14, 2021
Date Completed
January 19, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
· Recommended to use existing vaccination structures and delivery services as much as possible for distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines · Important to consider cold-chain requirements when developing distribution plans · Should consider alternate locations for hard-to-reach populations that are easily accessible and familiar · Consider branching out to mobile vaccination (e.g. home visits, door-to-door), pharmacies, workplaces, congregate living facilities, walk-up/drive-through mechanisms for vaccine delivery
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Health Planning
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Primary care
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Howell-Spooner, B. How are other jurisdictions distributing COVID-19 vaccines in non-healthcare worker environments and what is the rationale for those distribution models? 2021 Jan 19; Document no.: PH011401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 17 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
CC210301 ESR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2021
Date Completed
March 31, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Critical Care
scorecard could be prospectively applied by hospitals seeking a structured approach to decision-making
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
CC210301 ESR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2021
Date Completed
March 31, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Critical Care
Category
Administration
Clinical Management
Subject
Critical Care
Decision Making
Treatment
Facilities
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Young, C; Ellsworth, C. How to deliver remote ICU care for COVID-19 patients to avoid/prevent transfer from smaller communities to tertiary care hospitals. 2021 Mar 31; Document no.: CC210301 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 18 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
CC210301 RR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2021
Date Completed
April 6, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Critical Care
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
CC210301 RR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2021
Date Completed
April 6, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Critical Care
Key Findings
· Tele-ICU services are provided either by existing staff within the network to smaller centers, or outsourced to larger networks or independent firms · The impact of tele-ICU adoption can result in a decrease in ICU mortality as large as 32% · The impact of tele-ICU adoption of length of stay is mixed, with some studies reporting a significant decrease, while others report a small, but statistically insignificant decrease · The degree of impact of tele-ICU adoption is linked to several factors such as yearly admission rates, location (urban vs. rural) and level of authority given to the tele-ICU team leading to increased positive impacts.
Category
Administration
Clinical Management
Subject
Critical Care
Decision Making
Facilities
Treatment
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Young, C; Ellsworth, C; Howell-Spooner, B. How to deliver remote ICU care for COVID-19 patients to avoid/prevent transfer from smaller communities to tertiary care hospitals. 2021 Apr 6; Document no.: CC210301 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 13p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC081301-01 ESR
Question Submitted
August 12, 2020
Date Completed
August 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC081301-01 ESR
Question Submitted
August 12, 2020
Date Completed
August 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Diagnostics
Subject
Testing
Public Health
Decision Making
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M. Is pooled testing for COVID-19 equally as reliable as individual testing and what are the optimal pool testing sizes? 2020 Aug 12; Document no.: EOC081301-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 8 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC081301 RR
Question Submitted
August 12, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC081301 RR
Question Submitted
August 12, 2020
Date Completed
August 14, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Pool testing for COVID-19 can be equal to individual testing in terms of sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative prediction rates · Pooled testing is optimal for use when disease prevalence is low, as prevalence increases, optimal pool sizes decrease and efficiency is lost · At a prevalence of approximately 1%, optimal pool sizes have been found to be up to 13 · Pools of 5 were found to be equally efficient and could be done using 50% less tests up to a prevalence of 5% · Recommended for use in large scale asymptomatic screening, highest viral load occurs before symptoms so less likely to miss borderline positive in convalescent stage · Not recommended for clinical diagnostic use
Category
Diagnostics
Subject
Testing
Public Health
Decision Making
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M. Is pooled testing for COVID-19 equally as reliable as individual testing and what are the optimal pool testing sizes? 2020 Aug 14; Document no.: EOC081301 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 19 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC042401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
April 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
. This study was aimed to investigate the psychosocial influences on parental decision-making regarding young
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC042401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
April 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Family
Long Term Care
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
NICU
Oncology
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Boden, C; Ellsworth, C. What are best practices for engaging family care providers during a pandemic? 2020 Apr 30; Document no.: LTC042401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 32 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC042401 RR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
May 7, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
engagement include dignity and respect, information sharing, participation in care and decision making
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC042401 RR
Question Submitted
April 24, 2020
Date Completed
May 7, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Key Findings
Core concepts of family engagement include dignity and respect, information sharing, participation in care and decision making, and collaboration (Hart 2020).
A careful balance needs to be maintained between attending to patients’ physical and psychological needs and adhering to infection control guidelines, while offering psychological support to family members (Chan 2006).
The word ‘visitation’ does not adequately describe family members’ involvement. Family presence is a more suitable term as it redefines families as partners in care (Hart 2020). However, it is important to recognize that family presence is not a substitute for adequate staffing levels.
Very little guidance is provided in the literature on innovative or specific approaches engage family care providers during a pandemic. The literature mainly focuses on supporting alternate forms of communication such as telephone calls, or technology assisted communication through social media or video/voice calls.
Enhanced communication strategies that provide regular information to a primary family contact on the patient/resident condition and allow chosen care partners to contribute to decision making as much as possible are recommended (Koller 2006).
The negative impact of visitation restrictions places increased stress on patients/residents and families who are unable to provide or receive non-healthcare specific supportive care. Those with neurocognitive disorders or communication barriers are more significantly impacted.
Staff also report increased stress during family visitation restrictions due to the additional time required to take on a “familial role” for the patient/resident. These roles may include providing a supportive environment, social interaction, information sharing, and opportunities for play (Koller 2006a – pediatric hospital setting).
The search question did not specifically look at impact of visitation on infection rates; therefore, there is insufficient information to determine if visitation policies affect infection rates. However, a systematic review in pediatric hospital setting in Ontario found no connection between liberal visiting hours and increased SARS infection rates (Smith 2009).
When facilitating sibling visitation in the NICU, a pre-visit education process is recommended. Maternity settings may wish to consider a 'combination' policy, where the women's partners and/or significant other would have open visiting (all day), with restricted visiting for others. In other general hospital ward settings, open visiting with a 'quiet hour' is suggested (Smith 2009).
Category
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Family
Long Term Care
Population
All
Clinical Setting
ICU
Long Term Care
Medicine Unit
NICU
Oncology
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Tupper, S; Ward, H; Dalidowicz, M; Boden, C; Ellsworth, C; What are best practices for engaging family care providers during a pandemic? 2020 Apr 16; Document no.: LTC042401 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 22 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Only agreed upon contraindications against COVID-19 vaccination is for individuals with a history of allergic reactions to a component of the vaccine or an allergic reaction to a previous dose
Where allergies to components exist, vaccination with an alternative COVID-19 vaccine should be considered
Autoimmune conditions and treatments are not considered contraindications, however timing of vaccines in relation to treatment regimens should be considered
Category
Administration
Subject
Vaccination
Decision Making
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Young, C; Ellsworth, C. What are legitimate exemptions/contraindications for COVID-19 vaccines from a medical point of view? 2021 Jun 10, Document no.: EOC210502 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC210501v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 24, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Vaccines
Decision Making
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Ellsworth, C. What are other jurisdictions offering for incentive-based COVID-19? 2021 Aug 24, Document no.: EOC210501v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
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