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Document Type
Table
Review Code
PH021701 RR Table
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
June 9, 2021
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
Document Type
Table
Review Code
PH021701 RR Table
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
June 9, 2021
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Administration
Subject
Mental Health
Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Hamid, E; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. How has COVID-19 and the public health response to COVID-19 impacted mental health outcomes on children 5 to 18 years (school-age)? 2021 Jun 09, Document no.: PH021701 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
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PH021701 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH021701 RR
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
June 9, 2021
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
of Parents and Children During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A National Survey. Pediatrics [Internet]. 2020 Oct;146
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH021701 RR
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
June 9, 2021
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
Cohort studies identified worsening mental health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and other subjective mental health measures.
Cross-sectional studies reported post-pandemic prevalence rates of 7%-44% for depression, 6%-47.5% for anxiety, and 3%-22% for PTSD. Worsening sleep quality and increased frequency of substance use were also reported. Effects on self-harm and suicidality are inconclusive.
Risk factors for worsening mental health included identifying as female, older age or higher school grade, and increased use of technology or social media. Exercise was found to be protective.
Category
Administration
Subject
Mental Health
Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Hamid, E; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. How has COVID-19 and the public health response to COVID-19 impacted mental health outcomes on children 5 to 18 years (school-age)? 2021 Jun 09, Document no.: PH021701 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 18 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH021701v003 ESR
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
March 11, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
. Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2022;10:759066. Background: Several studies have described widening
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH021701v003 ESR
Question Submitted
February 17, 2021
Date Completed
March 11, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Administration
Subject
Mental Health
Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 3 Two weeks (14 days)
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Mueller, M. How has COVID-19 and the public health response to COVID-19 impacted mental health outcomes on children 5 to 18 years (school-age)? 2022 Mar 11, Document no.: PH021701v003 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 92 p. (CEST evidence search report).
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC220102 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC220102 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Pediatrics
Public Health
Vaccination
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Fox, L. Is there evidence that children under 18 should receive an mRNA vaccine booster/3rd dose? 2022 Feb 04, Document no.: EOC220102 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. (CEST table).
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EOC220102 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC220102 RR
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
Omicron] (112) 15 or/9-14 (234142) 16 exp Pediatrics/ or exp Infant/ or exp Child/ or Adolescent
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC220102 RR
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
February 4, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
The CDC has released a recommendation that all adolescents 12-17 be offered booster vaccines using only the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, at least 5 months following the primary series
The CDC guidelines follow the review of unpublished Israeli data of 12-15 year olds vaccinated 5-6 months prior showing an equivalent infection rate to unvaccinated, and that those who receive boosters are at about 1/3 of the risk
Health Canada has not yet approved booster doses for general use in 12-17 year olds, however NACI has recommended that boosters, at least 6 months following the primary series, should be considered for the following groups within that age group o Those with an underlying medical condition at high risk of severe illness due to COVID-19 (including those who are immunocompromised and received a 3-dose primary series) o Those who are residents in congregate settings (e.g. shelters, group homes, quarters for migrant workers, correctional facilities) o Those who belong to racialized and/or marginalized communities disproportionately affected by COVID-19
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Pediatrics
Public Health
Vaccination
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Fox, L. Is there evidence that children under 18 should receive the booster to increase their immunity? 2022 Feb 04, Document no.: EOC220102 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC220102v002 ESR
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
April 6, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
) 16 9 or 15 (261023) 17 exp Pediatrics/ or exp Infant/ or exp Child/ or Adolescent/ (3847058
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC220102v002 ESR
Question Submitted
January 10, 2022
Date Completed
April 6, 2022
Status
4. Update in progress
Research Team
EOC
Notes
Updated review not currently planned.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Immunity
Infection Prevention and Control
Pediatrics
Public Health
Vaccination
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Fox, L. Is there evidence that children under 18 should receive the booster to increase their immunity? 2022 Apr 06, Document no.: EOC220102v002 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2022. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH030801 RR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
March 30, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
to Children. The Journal of pediatrics. 2020;04:04. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.07.009. Available from: https
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH030801 RR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
March 30, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
Pediatric cases of COVID-19 constitute between 1% to 10% of all confirmed cases of COVID-19; variation exists by jurisdiction.
Few case reports exist of confirmed child-to-other transmission. Contact tracing studies suggest that children are unlikely to be transmitters of the disease. Households are the most likely environments for transmission.
A recent large South Korean contact tracing study however (in pre-print) found that household COVID-19 transmission rates for children age 10-19 were significantly higher than in adults; transmission rates for children age 0-9 were relatively low.
AUGUST 7th, 2020 UPDATE: No new studies examining secondary attack rates of pediatric index cases were found. Studies continue to suggest low transmission from pediatric cases, and high proportion of pediatric cases being asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic.
MARCH 9th, 2021 UPDATE: Variants of Concerns are an emerging threat, but literature on pediatric prevalence and transmissibility is sparse. The British variant seems more transmissible (secondary attack rate higher) but follows the same age-related distribution of cases seen earlier in the pandemic.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Variants
Pediatrics
Transmission
Schools
Population
All Pediatrics
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Coomaran, V; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What are the effects of the new COVID variants on transmission and school reopenings in pediatric populations? 2021 Mar 30; Document no.: PH030801 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 14p. (CEST rapid review report)
Similar Reviews
EOC072102-01 ESR
EOC070201v2-01 ESR
EOC081201-01 ESR
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH030801v2 ESR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
August 18, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak. Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics. 2021;64(7):322-7. ABSTRACT
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH030801v2 ESR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
August 18, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
Notes
Work was not completed before the project was no longer supported
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Variants
Pediatrics
Transmission
Schools
Population
All Pediatrics
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B., Mueller, M. What are the effects of the new COVID variants on transmission and school reopenings in pediatric populations? 2021 Aug 18, Document no.: PH030801v2 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 49 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Similar Reviews
EOC072102-01 ESR
EOC070201v2-01 ESR
EOC081201-01 ESR
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Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
CAC061802-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 18, 2020
Date Completed
July 2, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Clinical/Acute Care
in our results that did not identify a particular population (pediatrics) as they might have
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
CAC061802-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 18, 2020
Date Completed
July 2, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Clinical/Acute Care
Category
Healthcare Services
Administration
Subject
Ethics
Pediatrics
Triage
Acute Care
Population
All Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Dalidowicz, M. What are the ethical principles that underlie pediatric triage protocols? 2020 Jul 2; Document no.: CAC061802-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 24 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
CAC061802 RR
Question Submitted
June 18, 2020
Date Completed
July 21, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Clinical/Acute Care
of Pediatrics and Child Health has developed an ethical framework for use in emergency settings. The starting
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
CAC061802 RR
Question Submitted
June 18, 2020
Date Completed
July 21, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Clinical/Acute Care
Key Findings
· Key principles for the development of triage scoring systems are 1. Urgency 2. Survival 3. Likelihood of rapid benefit · Triage algorithms should be transparent and accessible, developed by teams with multiple perspectives/expertise · When all factors are equal, allocation should proceed by random/lottery assignment · Must balance egalitarian and utilitarian ideologies – providing equitable access while also providing the greatest benefit to the greatest number of people
Category
Healthcare Services
Administration
Subject
Ethics
Pediatrics
Triage
Acute Care
Population
All Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Badea, A; Radu, L; Hansen, G; Dalidowicz, M; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the ethical principles that underlie pediatric triage protocols? 2020 Jul 21; Document no.: CAC061802 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 24 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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19 records – page 1 of 2.