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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
VPL041602-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 19, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
productive – especially once we expanded the search by removing the self-isolation concept. The literature
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
VPL041602-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 19, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vulnerable Populations
Self-Isolation
Harm Reduction
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Young, C; Dalidowicz, M; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the best practices for delivery of harm reduction services to people who are self-isolating? 2020 May 27; Document no.: VPL041602-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
VPL041602 RR
Question Submitted
April 19, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
to provide carries for those in self-isolation. Some agencies recommend allowing up to 14 consecutive days
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
VPL041602 RR
Question Submitted
April 19, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
Key Findings
Reassessing procedures ofopioid agonist therapy(OAT)–reducing requirements to allow more to access OAT
Considerations of reducing contact by increasing duration of OAT carries for those previously ineligible, and ensuring closing of provision gaps due to weekends/stat holidays/etc.
Increased provision ofsuppliesfor patients
Changes to controlled substance regulations allow for phamacists to extend prescriptions, transfer prescriptions to other pharmacists, accept refills/prescriptions from providers by phone, and allowing the delivery of controlled substances; Recommendations around the prescription of “safe supply” of stimulants and illicit benzodiazepines include the prescription of low-dose medications under (virtual) supervision to reduce the potential for withdrawal
Deferring medical withdrawal management and dose reductions, considerations of transitioning to lower risk OAT
Ensuring access to culturally relevant psychosocial support, and allowing for pharmacological treatment without a requirement of abstinence or psychosocial therapy
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vulnerable Populations
Self-Isolation
Harm Reduction
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Badea, A; Fornssler, B; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the best practices for delivery of harm reduction services to people who are self-isolating 2020 Apr 20; Document no.: VPL041602 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
VPL041601-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 18, 2020
Date Completed
May 26, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
QUESTION: What are the best practices for self-isolation for transient populations? UNIQUE IDENTIFIER
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
VPL041601-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 18, 2020
Date Completed
May 26, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vulnerable Populations
Self-Isolation
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Young, C; Dalidowicz, M; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the best practices for self-isolation for transient populations? 2020 May 26; Document no.: VPL041601-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 20 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
VPL041601 RR
Question Submitted
April 18, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
Review Title: What are the best practices for self-isolation for transient populations? Keyword Title
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
VPL041601 RR
Question Submitted
April 18, 2020
Date Completed
April 19, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Vulnerable Populations
Key Findings
Across also sources reviewed, the ideal scenario is provision of safe self-isolating spacesin private accommodation(ideally own room and bathroom) through negotiations with hotels/hostels/community centers
Where self-isolation in private accommodation is not possible, consider risk stratification and cohorting of residentsin congregate sheltersalong a continuum of(cases/suspected)to (asymptomatic/medically vulnerable); recognizing the resulting impact of reduced bed density on bed capacity
Ideally designate shelters by cohort with testing and transfer protocols in place·Ensure infection control measures are in place, both at the institutional and personal infection control level –including education and visual cues.
Designate staff to specific cohortswith no transfer of staff between sites/cohorts·For those remainingon the streets/ sheltering outside, distribute supplies (water, hand sanitizer, food), information (symptomsphysical distancing, and access to health care), and provide access to public washrooms/ portable toilets & handwashing facilities
Working with established tent cities or establishing tent cities may be important to consider
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vulnerable Populations
Self-Isolation
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Badea, A; Abonyi, S; Hanson, L; Bourassa, C; Dalidowicz, M; Young, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the best practices for self-isolation for transient populations? 2020 Apr 19; Document no.: VPL041601 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC090801-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 2, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
cleared of COVID-19 do not need to be re-tested or undergo 14-days of self-isolation.” (pg. 12
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC090801-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 8, 2020
Date Completed
October 2, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Self-Isolation
Long Term Care
Health Planning
Elderly
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Long Term Care
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Mueller, M; Young, C. What is the evidence for a 14 day isolation period upon move-in to a continuing care environment during the COVID-19 pandemic? 2020 Oct 2; Document no.: LTC090801-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 29 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC090801 RR
Question Submitted
September 8, 2020
Date Completed
December 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
requiring a resident to have a negative test on admission, and 14 days of self-isolation with contact
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC090801 RR
Question Submitted
September 8, 2020
Date Completed
December 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Key Findings
No evidence was found as rationale for the 14-day isolation period on resident transition to LTC. This requirement likely arose from evidence that active monitoring for 14 days is sufficient to identify symptom onset in 99% of COVID-19+ cases (1).
No alternatives were found in Canada to a 14-day isolation period on transition of a resident into LTC. A rapid review of viral shedding and the need for isolation recommends a minimum 10-day isolation period, with additional consideration for high risk groups (36). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2) in the US is considering decreasing the standard 14-day quarantine period to 7-10 days in recognition that the general two-week quarantine rule is onerous for many people and most of the benefit of quarantine to public health could be gained with a more flexible and contextual approach. Implications for changes in Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) policy on quarantine or duration of isolation for admission to LTC are not yet established.
The Canadian policies at the provincial government levels align with the PHAC’s recommendation of 14 days of isolation (14). Most jurisdictions across Canada follow guidelines requiring a resident to have a negative test on admission, and 14 days of self-isolation with contact and droplet precautions (4, 17).
However, a few jurisdictions stratify the level of precaution or need for isolation by community transmission (3, 5). For example, the Province of Alberta’s (5) Operational and Outbreak Standards for LTC recommends the following safety precaution: for residents with low or unknown risk of exposure, twice daily symptom checks for 14 days; for residents with medium risk, continuous use of a mask for 14 days while out of resident room; for residents with high risk, quarantine for 14 days. Best practices on transition to LTC to support residents’ well-being
Some Canadian policies state the importance of protecting resident well-being on transition to LTC but provide little guidance on how to ensure this is done. For residents who might find self-isolation challenging (e.g. those with cognitive challenges), Government of New Brunswick (18) recommends taking efforts to ensure adequate staffing level and support residents’ individualized care plan.
Residents in LTC who have cognitive impairments will have difficulties understanding the need for isolation and absence of families and friends, and complying with isolation procedures (31). There is little guidance for long-term care facilities on how to support safe isolation of those living with cognitive impairments, while maintaining the human dignity and personhood of the individual. Strategies need to be developed to have an isolation care planning that is effective, safe, and compassionate (31).
Maintaining connections between residents and their families should be supported under safety, socio-emotional, and ethical grounds (39). Several provinces and international jurisdictions designate Essential Family Caregivers (EFCs), who are present not for social visits but to provide services and brought into the facilities under the same specific protocols as staff (39, 49, 50, 51).
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Administration
Subject
Facilities
Self-Isolation
Long Term Care
Health Planning
Elderly
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Long Term Care
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Gao, Y; Ward, H; Tupper, S; Boden, C; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What is the evidence for 14-day isolation upon move-in to long-term care during COVID-19 pandemic? 2020 Dec 13; Document no.: LTC090801 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 33 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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6 records – page 1 of 1.