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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC021901v2 ESR
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 21, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Group Rapid Evidence Report Updated review of prolonged symptoms after acute COVID-19 infection. [July
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC021901v2 ESR
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 21, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Long Covid
Clinical Presentation
Health Planning
Symptoms
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Long Term Care
Primary care
Priority Level
Level 5 Four weeks+ (28 days+)
Cite As
Mueller, M; Dalidowicz, M. Long COVID: What does it mean for the healthcare system and programs to? 2021 Oct 21, Document no.: EOC021901v2 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 70 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC021901v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 29, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Scientific Advisory Group Rapid Evidence Report Updated review of prolonged symptoms after acute COVID-19
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC021901v2 RR Table
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 29, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Long Covid
Clinical Presentation
Health Planning
Symptoms
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Long Term Care
Primary care
Priority Level
Level 5 Four weeks+ (28 days+)
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Dalidowicz, M. Long COVID: What does it mean for the healthcare system and programs? 2021 Oct 29. Document no.: EOC021901v2 RR Table. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST Table).
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EOC021901v2 RR Table

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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC021901v2 RR
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 29, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
) and COVID vaccination on progression of Long COVID symptoms remains unclear.  Risk factors
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC021901v2 RR
Question Submitted
February 19, 2021
Date Completed
October 29, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
October 29, 2021
In October, WHO released a consensus definition of post COVID-19 condition that includes 12 domains. This development should lead to better standardization of reporting and contribute to more precise prevalence estimates and better understanding of associated risk factors.
The effects of Variants of Concern (VoC) and COVID vaccination on progression of Long COVID symptoms remains unclear.
Risk factors for developing Long COVID symptoms were similar but limited evidence suggests that pre-pandemic psychological distress and poor general health were associated with developing persistent symptoms. Evidence is too limited to determine whether vaccination reduces the risk of developing Long COVID among persons with breakthrough infections.
Given the protean manifestations of Long COVID symptoms, the underlying causes are likely multifactorial; however, strong evidence to substantiate the theories of causation remains limited.
Research related to longer-term consequences of SARS CoV-2 infections in pediatric populations is growing but remains limited.
Key Findings
March 15, 2021
There is a lack of consensus around the clinical definition of Long COVID which in turn causes challenges with understanding the incidence and prevalence as well as the potential impact for the health care system
Information about the natural history of Long COVID is incomplete but limited evidence suggests that the immune response trajectories differ for those with few or no symptoms compared to those with severe disease. Individuals with severe disease are more likely to exhibit immunological marker abnormalities but anyone can experience functional limitations.
The mechanisms underlying the development of persistent symptoms in Long COVID remain an enigma. Despite multiple theories, there is little empirical evidence for specific immunological and or biochemical abnormalities in samples of individuals with symptoms consistent with Long COVID.
Risk factors for Long COVID include female gender, older age, higher body mass index, pre-existing asthma and the number of symptoms.
Few studies explored the short-term impact of Long COVID on health care utilization patterns and found a higher impact for those with severe disease compared with mild disease.
Category
Healthcare Services
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Long Covid
Clinical Presentation
Health Planning
Symptoms
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Ambulatory
Long Term Care
Primary care
Priority Level
Level 5 Four weeks+ (28 days+)
Cite As
Williams-Roberts, H; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Dalidowicz, M. Long COVID: What does it mean for the healthcare system and programs? 2021 Oct 29. Document no.: EOC021901v2 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 14 p. (CEST rapid review report).
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PPE041701 RR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report) Key Findings • The most commonly reported symptoms
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PPE041701 RR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
Key Findings
The most commonly reported symptoms inCOVID-19patientswere: fever (79-89%); cough (58-69%); fatigue/muscle aches (29-36%); dyspnea (22-38%); chest distress (31%); and expectoration (12-29%).
Less common were various GI symptoms (9-18%) including diarrhea (5-7%) and nausea (4%),as well as sore throat (10-12%) and headache (6-12%).
Although the Government of Canada lists runny nose as a potential symptom for a suspect case, it was not reported as such in the meta-analyses examined.
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Natural History
Symptoms
Screening
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
McCarron, M; Groot, G; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What distinguishes COVID-19 from influenza-like illnesses? 2020 Apr 17; Document no.: PPE041701 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 5 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PPE041701-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
likely to have lower respiratory symptoms (e.g. sputum production, shortness of breath, chest pain
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PPE041701-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 17, 2020
Date Completed
April 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Personal Protective Equipment
Category
Clinical Presentation
Subject
Natural History
Symptoms
Screening
Priority Level
Level 2 completed within 8 hours
Cite As
Miller, L; Dalidowicz, M. What distinguishes COVID-19 from influenza-like illnesses? 2020 Apr 16; Document no.: PPE041701-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC060201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 2, 2020
Date Completed
June 8, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
QUESTION: Case definition (signs and symptoms) for COVID-19 in the elderly UNIQUE IDENTIFIER: LTC060201
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC060201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 2, 2020
Date Completed
June 8, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Category
Clinical Presentation
Healthcare Services
Subject
Symptoms
Screening
Elderly
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Ellsworth, C. What is the case definition for COVID-19 in elderly people? 2020 Jun 8; Document no.: LTC060201-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 43 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC060201 RR
Question Submitted
June 2, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
and symptoms, both typical and atypical, for COVID-19 in the elderly Review ID: LTC060201 RR Date/Time
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC060201 RR
Question Submitted
June 2, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Key Findings
Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Findings, Imaging:
Signs and symptoms of COVID-19 are categorized as constitutional, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological, laboratory, imaging, and other.
Constitutional signs and symptoms include fever (Median=80% prevalence on cross-sectional retrospective chart reviews; range 30-98%), fatigue (M=41%; range 8-81%), myalgia or arthralgia (M=31%; range 5-63%), headache (M=9%; range 6-70%), sore throat (M=19%; range 11-53%), weight loss (M=31%; 23-50%), and hypotension (31%; Aggarwal et al., 2020).
Respiratory symptoms include cough (M=63%; range 33-88%), nasal congestion (M=41%; range 14-68%), rhinorrhea (M=7%; range 5-60%), dyspnea (M=53%; range 5-88%), phlegm (M=28%; range 18-40%), hemoptysis (5%; Xu et al., 2020) and chest tightness (M=40%; range 23-64%).
Gastrointestinal (GI) signs and symptoms include nausea and vomiting (M=14%; range 2-22%), diarrhea (M=18%; range 3-35%), and low appetite (M=21%; range 12-63%).
Approximately 36% of COVID-19+ patients present with neurological signs and symptoms which may include delirium, confusion, hallucinations, dizziness, seizure, or loss of senses of smell or taste. Presence of neurological findings is indicative of a worse outcome (Chen et al. 2020).
Abnormal laboratory findings are more common in older patients (Chen et al., 2020) and may include elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, lymphopenia, elevated D-dimer, leukopenia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, lower white blood cell count, lower oxygen saturation (=94% or supplemental oxygen required), and hyponatremia (Duan et al., 2020; Ihle-Hansen, et al.2020; Xu et al., 2020; Fu et al., 2020).
The majority of COVID-19 + patients have abnormal imaging findings including multiple mottling and ground glass opacities (GGO) on chest CT scan. Bilateral pneumonia is present in between 73-98% of adults in critical care (Fu et al., 2020; Du et al., 2020).
Other signs and symptoms observed in LTC home residents with dementia include increased falls, change in behavior from the previous shift, more unsettled, and increased wandering (Ihle-Hansen et al., 2020).
The majority of patients (63%) of all ages present with symptoms that have lasted between 4 and 7 days (Buckner et al. 2020; Ihle-Hansen et al., 2020; Lin et al., 2020).
See Table 2 for a summary of infrequent (<10%), frequent (20-50%), and very frequent (>60%)clinical manifestations, laboratory test abnormalities and radiographic findings from a paper by Bonanad et al. 2020. Screening and Testing Considerations:
Although 90.5% of COVID-19 + patients of all ages present with cough, fever, and/or breathlessness (Baker et al., 2020), screening for typical symptoms alone will fail to identify approximately half of those with COVID-19 who are elderly, particularly those with frailty and other co-morbidities (Kimball et al., 2020).
The majority of recommendations favour a more sensitive threshold for fever detection in older adults, i.e. 37.5°C or an increase of >1.5°C from usual temperature (Holroyd-Leduc et al., 2020).
Screening of older adults or those with comorbidities should include supplemental questions to determine if atypical symptoms are present such as fatigue, myalgias, headache, conjunctivitis, tachycardia, hypotension, and hypoxia. Presence of atypical symptoms should trigger COVID testing.
Tools developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health (2020) and Alberta Health Services (2020) may be useful guides for healthcare provider screening of individuals at higher risk of COVID-19 infections (i.e. frail older adults with comorbidities).
Prioritization of mass testing should be for those with atypical presentations. Specifically, testing should be commenced first for older adults with changes in delirium, unexplained or increased numbers of falls, weight loss, change in appetite, acute functional decline, or worsening chronic conditions (ON Ministry of Health COVID Screening Guide, 2020).
Category
Clinical Presentation
Healthcare Services
Subject
Symptoms
Screening
Elderly
Priority Level
Level 4 completed within 1 week
Cite As
Tupper, S; Ward, H; Dalidowicz, M; Ellsworth, C. What is the case definition for COVID-19 in elderly people? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: LTC060201 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 39 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC072102-01 ESR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
cases were identified. The most common symptoms were cough (13 cases, 52%) and fever (6 cases, 24
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC072102-01 ESR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Natural History
Symptoms
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Dalidowicz, M; Howell-Spooner, B; Ellsworth, C. What is the disease progression and epidemiology of COVID-19 in pediatric populations? 2020 Jul 31; Document no.: EOC072102-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 44 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC072102 RR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
cases of COVID-19 globally. • Children have been reported to have milder symptoms of COVID-19
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC072102 RR
Question Submitted
July 27, 2020
Date Completed
July 31, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
· Children and adolescents (0 to 18 years) contributed 1- 10% of laboratory confirmed cases of COVID-19 globally. · Children have been reported to have milder symptoms of COVID-19 and have shown better prognosis as compared to adults. · Severe cases presenting as a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) has been reported in some pediatric cases of COVID-19. Many of these children meet the criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease, but different clinical presentations of this inflammatory disorder are being reported. · Underlying medical conditions and comorbidities such as such as sickle cell disease, immunocompromised condition, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and asthma have been associated with severity and complications from COVID-19 infection in pediatric patients. · Although rare, death from COVID-19 in children have been reported, with a case fatality rate of less than 0.5%.
Category
Epidemiology
Subject
Pediatrics
Natural History
Symptoms
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Asamoah, G; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Ellsworth, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the disease progression and epidemiology of COVID-19 in pediatric populations? 2020 Jul 27; Document no.: EOC072102 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 17 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC092401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 24, 2020
Date Completed
September 25, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
RESEARCH QUESTION: What is the evidence that runny nose or sneezing are symptoms of COVID-19? UNIQUE
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC092401-01 ESR
Question Submitted
September 24, 2020
Date Completed
September 25, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Clinical Presentation
Administration
Subject
Symptoms
Screening
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Young, C; Howell-Spooner, B. What is the evidence that runny nose or sneezing are symptoms of COVID-19? 2020 Sep 25; Document no.: EOC092401-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 37 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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26 records – page 1 of 3.