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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
, Kisjes KH. Modeling Measles Transmission in the North American Amish and Options for Outbreak Response
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
PH061201-01 ESR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28207989 DOI: 10.1111/irv.12448 3. Thompson KM, Kisjes KH. Modeling Measles Transmission
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH061201 RR
Question Submitted
June 12, 2020
Date Completed
June 12, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
The Hutterian Safety Council has established a COVID-19 taskforce to provide guidance for communities to best prevent and cope with COVID-19
Only one published study has investigated the prevalence of coronaviruses in relation to influenza vaccination/infection in Hutterite populations. This study found that coronaviruses are much less prevalent than influenza, entero/rhinoviruses and pediatric RSV and that it occurred in all age groups.
This study also found a high degree of co-circulation of other respiratory viruses along with influenza, which invites the questioning of signs/symptoms falsely attributed to influenza and therefore influencing empiric use of antivirals
Most studies available focus on influenza, polio and other common vaccine-preventable childhood communicable disease
One study assessing influenza in Hutterite populations found that the immunization of children and adolescents led to a protective effect among the community over multiple years of seasonal influenza and provided ~60% herd protection
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Communal Living
Transmission
Population
All Pediatrics
All adults
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Okpalauwaekwe, U; Reeder, B; Howell-Spooner, B; Miller, L. How are Hutterite colonies responding to and coping with COVID-19 prevention and outbreaks? 2020 Jun 12; Document no.: PH061201 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
of transmission? UNIQUE IDENTIFIER: INF121501-01 ESR CONTEXT: Consider quantifiable reports of contact
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
INF121501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 15, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 16 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
source of transmission? Abbreviated Title: Review ID: INF121501 RR Date/Time: Dec 17, 2020 17:30
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
INF121501 RR
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Key Findings
· A recent evidence synthesis was completed by Public Health Ontario to answer a similar question. That synthesis has been deemed of sufficiently high quality and contains a recent enough evidence review to provide the necessary information to answer the question. Please refer to the attached document for the Key Points · We have reviewed the literature identified by our search that has been published since the time of the literature review in the Public Health Ontario evidence synthesis (i.e., between Oct 14, 2020 and Dec 15, 2020). No significant changes to the Key Points are noted. · Our team agrees with the conclusion of Public Health Ontario that the dominant mechanism of transmission is primarily through direct contact with respiratory droplets but that COVID-19 is an opportunistic airborne Rapid Review Report: INF121501 RR (Version 1: December 17, 2020 17:30) 2 pathogen, where aerosol transmission occurs under the right combination of conditions (for instance a poorly ventilated space where a high volume of virus can be produced and concentrated).
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 15; Document no.: INF121501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF121501 RR Table
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? Review ID: INF121501 Date/Time Published
Document Type
Table
Review Code
INF121501 RR Table
Question Submitted
December 15, 2020
Date Completed
December 17, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Infectious Disease
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Transmission
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Vanstone, J; Miller, L; Fox, L. How is COVID-19 transmitted from person-to-person and what is the most common source of transmission? 2020 Dec 17; Document no.: INF121501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. (CEST table)
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INF121501 RR Table

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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC033004-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2020
Date Completed
March 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
SEARCH REPORT RESEARCH QUESTION: What are effective methods to reduce disease transmission
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC033004-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2020
Date Completed
March 30, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Households
Transmission
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Fox, L. What are effective methods to reduce disease transmission within households? 2020 Mar 30; Document no.: EOC033004-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 7 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC033004 RR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2020
Date Completed
July 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Review Title: What are effective methods to reduce disease transmission within households? Abbreviated
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC033004 RR
Question Submitted
March 30, 2020
Date Completed
July 13, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Provide adequately ventilated separate space or space for sick person (COVID-19 positive) if possible.
Practice adequate and proper personal and environmental hygiene by both sick person and family members.
Sick person should reduce pet contacts or proper hygiene maintained if not possible
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Households
Transmission
Priority Level
Level 5 completed within 2 weeks
Cite As
Asamoah, G; Fox, L. What are effective methods to reduce disease transmission within households? 2020 Jul 13; Document no.: EOC033004 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC041501 RR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 16, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Review Title: What are the best practices for cohorting long-term care residents to reduce transmission
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
LTC041501 RR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 16, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Key Findings
There is limited information on transferring infected LTC residents to an off-site cohort location such as a purpose-built field hospital. Lessons learned from SARS suggest that transfers to dedicated facilities for cohorting may increase spread.
A greater number of recommendations support on-site cohorting of residents infected with droplet/contact transmitted illnesses. Health Canada’s COVID-19 Interim Guidance for LTC Homes report states that transfers within and between facilities should be avoided except for medically indicated procedures that cannot be provided by the long-term care home e.g. respiratory failure requiring ventilation or hemodynamic compromise.
Family members encourage cohorting a resident in the LTC home if possible. They also recommend following residents’ advanced care directives to determine whether life-sustaining measures are preferred, robust healthcare and psychosocial support for residents who are cohorted, and clear communication with residents and family members.
Cohorting on site includes isolation of residents to their rooms (preferably single occupancy) or dedicated units in the home. Staff and equipment cohorting should also be implemented if possible (i.e.dedicated staff that do not provide care to residents in non-infected units, and resident specific equipment).
Consider cohorting in day program spaces, recreation rooms, palliative care rooms, chapels, or dining rooms in the home that are no longer being used as common spacesas long as call bells or other appropriate communication measures are in place.
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Health Planning
Transmission
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Long Term Care
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Tupper, S; Ward, H; Ellsworth, C; Dalidowicz, M; Boden, C. What are the best practices for cohorting long-term care residents to reduce transmission of COVID-19? 2020 Apr 16; Document no.: LTC041501 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 10 p. (CEST rapid review report)
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Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC041501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 16, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
QUESTION: What are the best practices for cohorting long-term care residents to reduce transmission
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
LTC041501-01 ESR
Question Submitted
April 15, 2020
Date Completed
April 16, 2020
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
Long Term Care
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Facilities
Decision Making
Health Planning
Transmission
Population
Aged (80+)
Clinical Setting
Long Term Care
Priority Level
Level 3 completed within 2-3 days
Cite As
Tupper, S; Ward, H. What are the best practices for cohorting long-term care residents to reduce transmission of COVID-19? 2020 Apr 16; Document no.: LTC041501-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 41 p. (CEST evidence search report)
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Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH030801 RR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
March 30, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
Review Title: What are the effects of the new COVID variants on transmission and school reopenings
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
PH030801 RR
Question Submitted
March 8, 2021
Date Completed
March 30, 2021
Status
6. Cancelled
Research Team
Public Health
Key Findings
Pediatric cases of COVID-19 constitute between 1% to 10% of all confirmed cases of COVID-19; variation exists by jurisdiction.
Few case reports exist of confirmed child-to-other transmission. Contact tracing studies suggest that children are unlikely to be transmitters of the disease. Households are the most likely environments for transmission.
A recent large South Korean contact tracing study however (in pre-print) found that household COVID-19 transmission rates for children age 10-19 were significantly higher than in adults; transmission rates for children age 0-9 were relatively low.
AUGUST 7th, 2020 UPDATE: No new studies examining secondary attack rates of pediatric index cases were found. Studies continue to suggest low transmission from pediatric cases, and high proportion of pediatric cases being asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic.
MARCH 9th, 2021 UPDATE: Variants of Concerns are an emerging threat, but literature on pediatric prevalence and transmissibility is sparse. The British variant seems more transmissible (secondary attack rate higher) but follows the same age-related distribution of cases seen earlier in the pandemic.
Category
Epidemiology
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Variants
Pediatrics
Transmission
Schools
Population
All Pediatrics
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Sulaiman, F; Coomaran, V; Muhajarine, N; Dalidowicz, M; Miller, L. What are the effects of the new COVID variants on transmission and school reopenings in pediatric populations? 2021 Mar 30; Document no.: PH030801 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 14p. (CEST rapid review report)
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EOC070201v2-01 ESR
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39 records – page 1 of 4.