Skip header and navigation

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC011901-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
potential recipients of the covid vaccine are refusing vaccination (both HCW and citizens). What
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC011901-01 ESR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Risk
Infection Prevention and Control
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Mueller, M.; Young, C. How safe are the Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations? 2021 Jan 21; Document no.: EOC011901-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 31 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC011901 RR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 24, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
vaccine that are refusing vaccination (both HCW and citizens). Purpose We try to investigate
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC011901 RR
Question Submitted
January 19, 2021
Date Completed
January 24, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Initial findings from RCTs of the two authorized COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) reported that the vaccines are safe. However, subsequent reports show that the adverse and severe allergic reactions to these vaccines are higher than the general rates for vaccines.
Various regulatory agencies identify the risk for serious allergic reactions as low for the authorized vaccines, and they continue to monitor the vaccines’ safety closely.
Further investigations to make causal relationships with reported severe allergic reactions or deaths are needed.
Risks and benefits of receiving the vaccines should be discussed individually in vulnerable populations including pregnant or breast-feeding women, immunocompromised people, or frail elderly people.
Category
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Risk
Infection Prevention and Control
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Azizian, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Young, C. How safe are the Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations? 2021 Jan 24; Document no.: EOC011901 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 30 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
. Key Findings June 11, 2021  Only agreed upon contraindications against COVID-19 vaccination
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210502 RR
Question Submitted
May 27, 2021
Date Completed
June 10, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Only agreed upon contraindications against COVID-19 vaccination is for individuals with a history of allergic reactions to a component of the vaccine or an allergic reaction to a previous dose
Where allergies to components exist, vaccination with an alternative COVID-19 vaccine should be considered
Autoimmune conditions and treatments are not considered contraindications, however timing of vaccines in relation to treatment regimens should be considered
Category
Administration
Subject
Vaccination
Decision Making
Risk
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Badea, A; Groot, G; Reeder, B; Young, C; Ellsworth, C. What are legitimate exemptions/contraindications for COVID-19 vaccines from a medical point of view? 2021 Jun 10, Document no.: EOC210502 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC210501v2 ESR
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
& Silver Exchange  “Get Vaccinated Together, Daily Gold Giveaway” Lucky Draw to Encourage Vaccination
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC210501v2 ESR
Question Submitted
May 17, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Subject
Decision Making
Vaccines
Vaccination
Population
All
Priority Level
Level 1 2-3 days
Cite As
Ellsworth, C. What are other jurisdictions offering for incentive-based COVID-19 vaccine campaigns? 2021 Aug 17, Document no.: EOC210501v2 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 8 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC012201v3 ESR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 11, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
vaccination hesitancy and ways to improve vaccine acceptance and confidence. [15 June 2021]. https
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC012201v3 ESR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 11, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Health Planning
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Young, C; Mueller, M. What are the causes of vaccine hesitancy? What programs/approaches have been successful in reducing vaccine hesitancy? 2021 Aug 11, Document no.: EOC012201v3 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 26 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Review History
EOC012201v2 RR: May 10, 2021
EOC012201 RR: February 1, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
.  Significant uptake of vaccination is due to the tailored recommendation of health provider in hesitant
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Updated Key Findings
August 17, 2021
New search completed August 17, 2021 containing 8 grey literature sources and 51 published journal articles including preprints.
Review of new search resulted in conformation of previously compiled information, relevant evidences and updates have been added to evidence table to reflect updated review.
Vaccine hesitancy was most commonly found in females and pregnant women as males generally showed greater willingness towards vaccine uptake.
Regardless of country and phase of the pandemic, there were evidences of widespread mistrust in the healthcare system and the governments with speed of vaccine development and approval. The greatest impact was seen in minority groups and people of colour.
Significant uptake of vaccination is due to the tailored recommendation of health provider in hesitant population, this has reinforced the importance of vaccination and also promoted vaccination of children with hesitant parents.
Previous vaccination has a positive influence on covid 19 vaccine uptake, (most popularly with influenza vaccine)
Higher age and underlying conditions/vulnerability to diseases along with employment and retirement had significantly lower vaccine hesitancy.
Greater financial incentives were some of the modifying of attitudes towards vaccination.
Social media and internet had mixed impact on hesitancy- restriction of certain vaccines had a direct impact on vaccination uptake whereas some reinforced confidence.
Key Findings
May 10, 2021
New search completed April 19, 2021 containing 29 grey literature sources and 128 published articles
Review of new search resulted in confirmation of previously compiled information, review update deemed not necessary at this time, relevant evidence has been added to the evidence table to reflect updated review February 1, 2021
Vaccine hesitancy towards the COVID vaccine varies from 2% to 44% in the general population, depending on country, phase of pandemic and specific population
Vaccine hesitancy tends to be lower in healthcare workers than the general population, but still exists at rates up to 56%, again, dependent on the country of residence and phase of the pandemic
The most commonly cited reasons for vaccine hesitancy are concerns about the efficacy and safety, largely due to the expedited testing/approval process
Country of residence and corresponding trust in government/pharmaceutical industries can have a significant role in vaccine acceptance
Strategies to increase vaccine uptake should range from personal-level interventions such as patient education materials to health system level interventions such as healthcare provider training and targeted population vaccine acceptance campaigns
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Health Planning
Vaccination
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Young, C. What are the causes of vaccine hesitancy? What programs/approaches have been successful in reducing vaccine hesitancy? 2021 Aug 17 Document no.: EOC012201v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 15 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Review History
EOC012201v2 RR: May 10, 2021
EOC012201 RR: February 1, 2021
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
hesitancy. 16-Aug-21 https://cancovid.ca/product/determinants-of-covid-19-vaccination-hesitancy-and-ways
Document Type
Table
Review Code
EOC012201v3 RR Table
Question Submitted
January 22, 2021
Date Completed
August 17, 2021
Status
5. Updated review
Research Team
EOC
Category
Healthcare Services
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccination
Health Planning
Population
All adults
Clinical Setting
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Jagwani, M; Badea, A; Groot, G; Mueller, M; Young, C. What are the causes of vaccine hesitancy? What programs/approaches have been successful in reducing vaccine hesitancy? 2021 Aug 17. Document no.: EOC012201v3 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. (CEST table).
Review History
EOC012201v2 RR: May 10, 2021
EOC012201 RR: February 1, 2021
Related Documents
Documents

EOC012201v3 RR Table

Download File
Less detail
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC031001-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 10, 2021
Date Completed
March 11, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
-01 ESR Complete Date: March 11, 2021 Subject(s): Vaccines; Vaccination; Decision Making Cite
Document Type
Evidence Search Report
Review Code
EOC031001-01 ESR
Question Submitted
March 10, 2021
Date Completed
March 11, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Vaccination
Decision Making
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Miller, L; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the differences between COVID-19 vaccines and how should they be distributed based on population group(s)? 2021 Mar 11; Document no.: EOC031001-01 ESR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 11 p. (CEST evidence search report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC031001 RR
Question Submitted
March 10, 2021
Date Completed
March 18, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
essential workers and other essential workers receive vaccination in early phases. Examples for frontline
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC031001 RR
Question Submitted
March 10, 2021
Date Completed
March 18, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Current recommendations suggest phased distribution of authorized vaccines and prioritization of the recipients (e.g., health care workers, frontline essential workers, and elderly population).
A concern that could exist with using AstraZeneca on critical populations is that it may have little coverage for mild-moderate B.1.351, which may have implications in transmission. This could be a concern in critical workforces if the variant becomes predominant, especially given the potentially higher transmissibility of variant. The literature is mixed but it is possible that AstraZeneca has lower efficacy than the mRNA vaccines.
Canadian National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends that in the context of limited vaccine supply, initial doses of mRNA vaccines should be prioritized for those at highest risk of severe illness and death and highest risk of exposure to COVID-19. On the other hand, US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends no product preference for the vaccines.
Just recently, NACI has expanded its recommendation for the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine to all people over the age of 18, now including those 65 years of age and over.
While Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are mRNA vaccines and need special logistical and transportation considerations, AstraZeneca and Johnson&Johnson (J&J) vaccines are viral vector vaccines that are easier to transport.
J&J is a single dose vaccine thus may be more appropriate in certain settings (such as homeless shelters and correctional facilities). Of note, there is no empirical evidence yet available to support this use; this suggestion is based simply on the nature of the vaccine.
Category
Administration
Infection Prevention and Control
Subject
Vaccines
Vaccination
Decision Making
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Azizian, A; Shumilak, G; Lee, S; Reeder, B; Groot, G; Miller, L; Howell-Spooner, B. What are the differences between COVID-19 vaccines and how they should be distributed based on population group(s)? 2021 Mar 18; Document no.: EOC031001 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2020. 19 p. (CEST rapid review report)
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210503 RR
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
available at the end of report. Key Findings  Requiring proof of vaccination for entry
Document Type
Rapid Review
Review Code
EOC210503 RR
Question Submitted
May 28, 2021
Date Completed
June 21, 2021
Status
3. Completed
Research Team
EOC
Key Findings
Requiring proof of vaccination for entry into another country is not a new idea. There are regulations that need to be followed to set up a “vaccine passport” in relation to international travel (International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005))
At present the World Health Organization does not recommend vaccine passports for international travel, but they are working on a standard Smart Vaccination Certificate technical specification and standards to allow for harmonised processes to include COVID-19 vaccines into an updated version of the IHR (2005)
Countries around the world are beginning to put vaccine passports into place for international travel, as well as in some countries within country travel and access to services or businesses including Israel, France, Italy, Denmark, and the EU
The Canadian Federal government is supportive of a vaccine passport for international travel but recognize the issuing of vaccine passports will need to be province led
As of May 13, 2021, the province of Quebec has begun issuing a downloadable QR code that individual can keep on their smart phone.
As of June 9, 2021, the Federal government of Canada discussed easing restrictions for fully vaccinated Canadian citizens returning to the country
Ethical considerations in the use of vaccine passports include equitable access to vaccination (domestically and internationally), access to technology (eg. Smartphone passports), marginalization, or stigmatization especially among historically racialized groups, and socially isolated populations
Legal considerations include o Clarifying who has the legal authority to require proof of vaccination, o Ensuring that if new legislation is created and implemented it is in line with all pre-existing legislation (Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Human Rights Codes, privacy legislation, employment legislation), o Ensuring that, if created by the government, there is coordination of the Provincial and Federal governments for international travel with respect to jurisdictional overlap, security of information, fraud
Health care facilities should be able to legally enact vaccination policies for patient-facing employees so long as they allow for exemptions due to medical inability or bona fide religious, or conscientious beliefs
Six in ten Canadians (61%) expect vaccine passports to be widely used in Canada by the end of 2021, the same proportion (61%) of Canadians also agreed that only vaccinated people should be allowed to engage in events involving larger crowds such as public transit, air travel, or attending cultural and sports events
Category
Administration
Subject
Ethics
Decision Making
Vaccination
Population
All
Clinical Setting
Community
Public Health
Priority Level
Level 2 One week (7 days)
Cite As
Lashta E, von Tigerstrom B, Reeder B, Groot G; Miller, L; Mueller, M. What are the ethical/legal aspects of vaccine requirements? 2021 Jun 21, Document no.: EOC210503 RR. In: COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Reviews [Internet]. SK: SK COVID Evidence Support Team, c2021. 25 p. (CEST rapid review report).
Related Documents
Documents
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.